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Soaring temperatures in the Australian state of New South Wales of over 100°F have triggered fresh bushfires, while dust has produced brown rain in Victoria.

What's happening: Dust storms have been pummeling parts of southeast Australia for days. A massive bushfire in the Australian Capital Territory impacted flights at Canberra Airport, where hail the size of golf balls struck earlier in the week. The storms come days after floods hit southeast Queensland, which has also been impacted by the fires. Here's what's been happening, in photos.

"Cars were covered in dust and combined with the rain made for a muddy start to the day," the Bureau of Meteorology, Victoria said. Photo: BOM/Twitter
Hail the size of golf balls outside Parliament House in Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, on Monday. Photo: Rohan Thomson/Getty Images
A flooded road in Queensland Saturday. Photo: Queensland Fire and Emergency Services/Twitter
A Humane Society International crisis response specialist carries a baby Koala she rescued last Wednesday on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. 26 bushfires were still burning in the state Monday, the Country Fire Service said. Photo: Peter Parks/AFP via Getty Images
A firefighter works to save a prehistoric wollemi pine tree in Wollemi National Park, New South Wales — "the only place in the world where these trees are found in the wild," according to NSW Parks and Wildlife, which notes there are fewer than 200. Photo: NSW Parks and Wildlife/Facebook
Regrowth at Cunningham's Gap, Queensland, which has received plenty of rain in recent days, according to local Jo McKee. The road at the area popular with tourists closed over Friday night "due to slips created by the fires" with "lots of foliage dislodged," she said. Photo: Jo McKee

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