Expand chart
Data: Company earnings reports; Chart: Axios Visuals

As iPhone sales have tapered off, Apple has been putting increasing focus on growing its services business.

Why it matters: What started out as cloud storage and extended support contracts, Apples' "services" revenue sector has expanded to include Apple Music and will soon likely expand further to news, video and gaming.

The details: Apple has made an aggressive push into media and entertainment over the past year, which has sparked rumors that it could one day sell a bundled subscription, where consumers could potentially pay one fee for an array of entertainment and media services.

  • News: Apple is set to debut a news subscription business at a March 25 media event, even though publishers are balking at the terms Apple is offering, mostly objecting to Apple's reported take of almost half the revenue and limits on their access to customer data.
  • Video: The company is also looking to debut a new video streaming product in April, CNBC reports. The service will include free original content for Apple device owners and a the ability subscribe to other video services.
  • Gaming: Apple is planning a subscription service for games, Cheddar reported last month. The service would act like a Netflix for gaming, giving users access to many different games under one subscription payment.
  • Music: In a push to gain more subscribers, Apple Music sent notices to subscribers last week that they can now give a month's worth of free access to a friend with their referral. The week before it offered lapsed users three months of free access for resubscribing.

The big picture: Apple has pledged that, by 2020, its services business will be double what it was in 2017. However, hardware in general — and the iPhone in particular— still dominate companywide revenue.

What's next: The Wall Street journal reports that the tech giant is "shaking up leadership and reordering priorities across its services, artificial intelligence, hardware and retail divisions as it works to reduce the company’s reliance on iPhone sales."

Go deeper

Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.