Tim Cook was the speaker at Duke's commencement on Sunday. Photo: Duke University/YouTube

Although a Washington Post story suggested Apple was eyeing Northern Virginia for a new campus, another report (from WRAL) says a move to North Carolina is already "a done deal."

What's next?: The only remaining hurdle for closing on the Research Triangle Park location, according to the report, was for state legislators to pass some tax breaks as an incentive for Apple.

Why North Carolina: It's already home to a bunch of high tech companies, including IBM and Lenovo, has an educated — and diverse — workforce and is close to a number of top universities. Tim Cook is also a Duke alum and gave the school's commencement address on Sunday.

But what about Virginia?: A careful read of the Post piece notes that Northern Virginia officials were pitching Apple on the merits and possible locations. That almost certainly happened in many locales. But unlike Amazon's much-hyped hunt for a second headquarters, Apple didn't have a public bidding contest. Even the cities under consideration by Apple didn't necessarily know they were.

What's at stake: Apple said in January it was looking to build a new corporate campus in a city outside of California or Texas. (Apple already has around 6,000 people in Austin.)

Unlike with the Amazon deal, Apple isn't planning a second headquarters — just another large center of operations. It will be interesting to see what functions Apple puts there. Initially the company mentioned technical support as one area, but clearly there's a lot of other possibilities.

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In photos: Virginians line up for hours on first day of early voting

Photo: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

In some parts of Virginia, people waited in line up to four hours to cast their ballots on the first day of early voting, according to the Washington Post.

The big picture: The COVID-19 pandemic seems to already have an impact on how people cast their votes this election season. As many as 80 million Americans are expected to vote early, by mail or in person, Tom Bonier, CEO of TargetSmart, a Democratic political data firm, told Axios in August.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 30,306,469 — Total deaths: 948,147— Total recoveries: 20,626,515Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4:30 p.m. ET: 6,705,114 — Total deaths: 198,197 — Total recoveries: 2,540,334 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.

Court battles shift mail-in voting deadlines in battleground states

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Michigan joins Pennsylvania in extending mail-in ballot deadlines by several days after the election, due to the coronavirus pandemic and expected delays in U.S. Postal Service.

The latest: Michigan Court of Claims Judge Cynthia Stephens ruled that all ballots postmarked before Nov. 2 must be counted, so long as they arrive in the mail before election results are certified. Michigan will certify its general election results on Nov. 23.