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Amy Coney Barrett took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice at a White House ceremony Monday night, soon after the Senate voted to confirm her nomination to the high court in a 52-48 vote.

The state of play: Justice Clarence Thomas administered the oath. The Supreme Court wrote in a statement that Barrett will take the judicial oath on Tuesday, at which point she will be able to begin her work on the court.

What she's saying: "The oath that I have solemnly taken tonight means at its core that I will do my job without any fear or favor and that I will do so independently of both the political branches and of my own preferences," Barrett said after taking the oath.

  • "I love the Constitution and the democratic republic that it establishes and I will devote myself to preserving it," she added.

Of note: Officials took steps to avoid a repeat of what happened when people sat cramped together for Barrett's Rose Garden celebration last month — which NIAID director Anthony Fauci described as "a superspreader event" after several attendees contracted COVID-19, including President Trump.

  • For the constitutional swearing-in ceremony, folding chairs were spaced about six feet apart on the South Lawn.
  • "We'll be doing the best we can to encourage as much social distancing as possible," White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said before the event.

Editor's note: This article has been updated with details on the coronavirus precautions and further context.

Go deeper

Sen. Whitehouse: Election unlikely to end up before the Supreme Court

Axios' politics and White House editor Margaret Talev (left) and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.)

President Trump’s attempts to take lawsuits challenging the way ballots were counted in some states to the Supreme Court will likely amount to nothing, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D-R.I.) said at a virtual Axios event on Friday.

Why it matters: Falsely claiming that Joe Biden is stealing the election, the president has filed a rash of lawsuits in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Michigan, Nevada. He has repeatedly stated he will bring them to the Supreme Court, likely hoping a conservative court will rule in his favor.

Updated Nov 6, 2020 - Politics & Policy

"This is getting insane": Republicans rebuke Trump over baseless election claims

President Trump speaking in the White House Briefing Room on Nov. 5. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

A growing list of Republicans have reproached President Trump for his baseless claims of widespread voter fraud.

Why it matters: In televised remarks on Thursday evening, the president provided no evidence for his claim that widespread voter fraud has caused his initial lead in the presidential race to slip away. He also pledged to continue fighting to have ballots thrown out in the courts.

Updated 7 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.

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