May 7, 2019

Scoop: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in talks to do Green New Deal doc

Photo: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) is in talks with documentary filmmaker Rachel Lears about a new project that would chronicle the freshman Democrat's Green New Deal policy movement, according to two sources familiar with the project.

Between the lines: Lears is same filmmaker behind the new Netflix documentary called "Knock Down the House," which chronicles the campaigns of four women running in the 2018 midterms, including Ocasio-Cortez.

Yes, but: Sources say Lears is making the film independently, and it may or may not end up in Netflix's hands.

  • Netflix bought the rights to distribute Lears' "Knock Down the House" for $10 million earlier this year after the film debuted at the Sundance Film Festival in January.
  • Deadline Hollywood Co-Editor-in-Chief Mike Fleming writes that it may be the biggest documentary sale ever brokered at a film festival. 

The big picture: Netflix and other streamers have been instrumental in driving forward a resurgence of news documentaries.

  • For example, Barack Obama and Michelle Obama's production company, Higher Ground Productions, unveiled an initial slate of programming last week in partnership with Netflix.

Our thought bubble: Audience demand for more documentary news programming on streaming services makes sense, given the fact that younger generations are tuning out traditional TV and thus long-form linear news programs like "Dateline" or "60 Minutes."

Go deeper: Wisconsin swing voters know AOC better than most 2020 Democrats

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Cuomo: Data suggests coronavirus curve may be flattening in New York

The total number of new hospitalizations, ICU admissions and daily intubations in New York have decreased each of the past three days — an indication that social distancing may be working, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Monday.

The big picture: The governor's office has been tracking different models that predicted a peak of between 55,000 and 110,000 hospital beds needed for coronavirus patients in New York by the end of April. Data over the past few weeks suggests that hospitalizations may potentially be plateauing earlier than those models projected.

Go deeperArrow24 mins ago - Health

Acting Navy head called fired aircraft carrier captain "stupid" in address to crew

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Acting Navy Secretary Thomas Modly told the crew of the USS Theodore Roosevelt Monday that its ousted commander, Capt. Brett Crozier, was "too naive or too stupid" to not realize that his letter pleading for help in battling a coronavirus outbreak onboard would be leaked to the press, according to a copy of his remarks obtained by CNN.

The big picture: Modly also floated the possibility that Crozier, who has since been diagnosed with coronavirus himself, leaked the letter deliberately. He called the act a "betrayal of trust, with me, with his chain of command."

Serological coronavirus testing could be key to economic reopening

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

America's economy won't reopen anytime soon, despite frantic CEO whispers, but a glimmer of hope may be emerging in the form of serological testing.

Why it matters: Serologic tests aren't to determine whether or not you're infected with coronavirus. They are to determine if you have potential immunity that could allow you to safely return to work.