If we've learned anything from recent advertising controversies it's that when united, advertisers can force publishers to make changes.

Why it matters: Less than three days after the NY Times report that Fox News had settled multiple sexual harassment lawsuits against Bill O'Reilly, at least 20 major advertisers announced they were pulling their ads from the network's biggest money-maker, The O'Reilly Factor. Fox has not indicated any plans to cut O'Reilly from its primetime slot yet, but if more advertisers continue to boycott the show the network may be forced to take action in order to save its bottom line.

YouTube Controversy: Beginning in early March, advertisers began pulling video ads from YouTube because they were appearing next to extremist content. After dozens of advertisers, worth millions of dollars, pulled their buys, Google apologized and vowed to revise its ad policies to convince advertisers that their platform was brand-safe.

Breitbart controversy: Last month, advertisers blacklisted Bretibart News from ad plans due to controversial content and after the site's biggest star, Milo Yiannopoulos, was forced to resign over comments about pedophilia. After over 1,000 advertisers pulled their ads, Breitbart executives told Fox Business that the association with the far-right was hurting their business and they planned to pivot to a more mainstream audience.

This isn't a totally new idea: In 2007, NBC announced they would no longer simulcast Don Imus' show Imus in the Morning, after dozens of advertisers, starting with Procter and Gamble, pulled their ads. In 2011, Glenn Beck resigned from Fox News after hundreds of advertisers pulled out due to controversial comments he made on air.

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Updated 30 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11 p.m. ET: 19,511,596 — Total deaths: 724,590 — Total recoveries — 11,876,387Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11 p.m. ET: 4,995,369 — Total deaths: 162,461 — Total recoveries: 1,643,118 — Total tests: 61,080,587Map.
  3. Politics: Trump signs 4 executive actions on coronavirus aid — Democrats slam Trump, urge GOP to return to negotiations
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective — 1 in 3 Americans would decline COVID-19 vaccine.
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. Schools: How back-to-school is playing out in the South as coronavirus rages on — Princeton, Johns Hopkins, Howard to hold fall classes online.

Trump signs 4 executive actions on coronavirus aid

President Trump speaking during a press conference on Aug. 8. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump on Saturday signed four executive actions to provide relief from economic damage sustained during the coronavirus pandemic after talks between the White House and Democratic leadership collapsed Friday afternoon.

Why it matters: Because the Constitution gives Congress the power to appropriate federal spending, Trump has limited authority to act unilaterally — and risks a legal challenge if congressional Democrats believe he has overstepped.

10 hours ago - World

What's next for Lebanon after the Beirut explosion

Photo: Houssam Shbaro/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Beirut residents are still clearing rubble from streets that appear war-torn, days after a blast that shocked the country and horrified the world.

Why it matters: The explosion is likely to accelerate a painful cycle Lebanon was already living through — discontent, economic distress, and emigration.