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Pro-choice supporters outside the Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services Center in St. Louis, Missouri on May 31, 2019. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Attorneys from Alabama, Georgia, Ohio and Texas joined 38 others in a joint declaration that they will not prosecute women who obtain abortions or health-care providers involved in the process as required under some recently enacted abortion laws.

Where it stands: Only 2 of 9 abortion bans across the U.S. are currently in effect, in Utah and Arkansas — where abortions are limited in the middle of the second trimester. Laws in Georgia, Missouri and Alabama call for arresting health-care providers involved in providing access to abortion.

Between the lines: The Alabama lawyer who wrote the state's restrictive abortion ban, Eric Johnston, expected a lawsuit since the ban goes against Roe v. Wade. The ACLU and the Alabama Women's Center sued Alabama over the ban in May, claiming it "directly conflicts with Roe."

What they're saying:

"As some elected prosecutors have noted, the broad restrictions in the laws passed by these states appear to be unconstitutional under Roe v. Wade. Many of us share those legal views, but our commitment to not prosecute women who obtain abortions and health care professionals who provide treatment is not predicated on these concerns alone."
— The attorneys' joint statement, issued through Fair and Just Prosecution

Read the full statement:

Go deeper: Where each state stands if Roe v. Wade is overturned

Editor's note: This story has been updated to indicate that 42 attorneys will not prosecute women who obtain abortions, rather than women who seek the procedure.

Go deeper

GOP Sen. Chuck Grassley announces run for re-election

Photo: Greg Nash/The Hill/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), the longest-serving Senate Republican, announced on Friday that he's running for re-election in 2022.

Why it matters: The GOP is looking to regain control of both chambers of Congress in the upcoming midterm elections. Several Republicans had urged the 88-year-old senator to run to avoid another retirement after five incumbent senators said they wouldn't seek re-election.

China deems all cryptocurrency transactions illegal

A person walking past China's central bank in Beijing in August 2007. Photo: Teh Eng Koon/AFP via Getty Images

China's central bank declared on Friday that all cryptocurrencies are illegal, banning crypto-related transactions and cryptocurrency mining, according to Reuters.

Why it matters: China's government is now following through with its goal of cracking down on unofficial virtual currencies, which it has said are a financial, social and national security risk and a contributor to global warming.

Biden's big bet backfires

Two key dealmakers — Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) and Sen. Mark Warner (D-Va.) — leave a luncheon in the Capitol yesterday. Photo: Kent Nishimura/L.A. Times via Getty Images

President Biden bit off too much, too fast in trying to ram through what would be the largest social expansion in American history, top Democrats privately say.

Why it matters: At the time Biden proposed it, he had his mind set on a transformational accomplishment that would put him in the pantheon of FDR and JFK.