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Prrotesters outside the Supreme Court in D.C. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Gov. Kay Ivey announced that she signed Alabama's restrictive abortion ban on Wednesday, with the only exception for mothers whose lives are in danger.

"To the bill’s many supporters, this legislation stands as a powerful testament to Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God."
— Gov. Kay Ivey in a statement

What she's saying: Ivey noted that even though the bill is now law, it may still be "unenforceable" as a result of the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision.

Why it matters: Alabama is the latest conservative state to pass a bill aimed at limiting abortions, but this is the most restrictive in the U.S. State lawmakers have said their eventual aim is to challenge abortion protections that have existed at the federal level since Roe v. Wade in 1973.

The big picture: The Alabama law will make abortions a felony at any stage of a woman's pregnancy. It criminalizes the procedure for physicians, who could face up to 99 years in prison if convicted. The only exception to the ban is if the woman's health is at risk. The Alabama House of Representatives voted 74-3 to pass the bill earlier this month.

What they're saying: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi tweeted: "Women’s rights are under attack. This relentless and cruel Republican assault on women’s health is designed to force a court battle to destroy Roe v. Wade. Democrats will be ready to defend health care and women’s reproductive freedom."

  • Democratic presidential hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders had called the bill "cruel" and "blatantly unconstitutional" as he urged Ivey to veto it.

Go deeper: Red America's anti-abortion surge

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
49 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden's "overwhelming force" doctrine

President-elect Biden arrives to introduce his science team in Wilmington yesterday. Photo: Kevin Lamarque/Reuters

President-elect Biden has ordered up a shock-and-awe campaign for his first days in office to signal, as dramatically as possible, the radical shift coming to America and global affairs, his advisers tell us. 

The plan, Part 1 ... Biden, as detailed in a "First Ten Days" memo from incoming chief of staff Ron Klain, plans to unleash executive orders, federal powers and speeches to shift to a stark, national plan for "100 million shots" in three months.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear. Read episode 1.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.