Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Pro-choice and abortion rights activists protesting outside the U.S. Supreme Court. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Energized by the Supreme Court's solid conservative majority, Ohio Republican Gov. Mike DeWine signed one of the country’s most restrictive abortion measures into law on Thursday, criminalizing the procedure after the first detectable fetal heartbeat — which can be as early as 6 weeks into pregnancy.

The big picture: The "fetal heartbeat" measure, approved by the GOP-controlled legislature on Wednesday, prohibits abortion at a point when many women aren't even aware they are pregnant. The passage comes as a growing number of Republican-led state legislatures are unleashing a fierce assault on abortion rights by adopting similar bans.

Details: Per the Ohio measure, which former-Gov. John Kasich vetoed twice in 2016 and 2018, physicians who perform abortions — either after a heartbeat is detected or fail to do an ultrasound to detect one — would face a fifth-degree felony.

  • The doctors could serve between 6 to 12 months behind bars, face a $2,500 court fine, and a $20,000 fine from the State Medical Board of Ohio.
  • The law makes no exceptions for cases of rape and incest.

The state of play: "Fetal heartbeat" measures are popping up in Republican-controlled states across the country, despite facing numerous legal challenges along the way.

Why it matters: The nationwide push collides with Supreme Court rulings that allow abortions up to 24 weeks during pregnancy when the fetus is not viable — or when a woman's health or life is at risk. But that hasn’t stopped conservatives, emboldened by Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s elevation to the nation's highest court last year, from sharpening their focus.

  • Conservatives and anti-abortion groups could hardly be more blatant about their intent. They want to land a successful lawsuit before the Supreme Court to overturn or weaken Roe v. Wade — the landmark 1973 ruling that made abortion legal nationwide.

The bottom line: These measures are further polarizing the already politically charged issue of abortion access, especially on a more local level.

  • Mike Gonidakis, president of Ohio Right to Life, said Wednesday in a statement: "[This] is the next incremental step in our strategy to overturn Roe v. Wade. While other states embrace radical legislation to legalize abortion on demand through the ninth month of pregnancy, Ohio has drawn a line and continues to advance protections for unborn babies."
  • Just moments after DeWine signed the bill, the American Civil Liberties Union tweeted: "We'll see you in court."

Go deeper: Trump's anti-abortion push

Editor's note: This story has been updated to include that the Ohio governor signed the measure.

Go deeper

Salesforce rolls the dice on Slack

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Salesforce's likely acquisition of workplace messaging service Slack — not yet a done deal but widely anticipated to be announced Tuesday afternoon — represents a big gamble for everyone involved.

For Slack, challenged by competition from Microsoft, the bet is that a deeper-pocketed owner like Salesforce, with wide experience selling into large companies, will help the bottom line.

FBI stats show border cities are among the safest

Data: FBI, Kansas Bureau of Investigation; Note: This table includes the eight largest communities on the U.S.-Mexico border and eight other U.S. cities similar in population size and demographics; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

U.S. communities along the Mexico border are among the safest in America, with some border cities holding crime rates well below the national average, FBI statistics show.

Why it matters: The latest crime data collected by the FBI from 2019 contradicts the narrative by President Trump and others that the U.S.-Mexico border is a "lawless" region suffering from violence and mayhem.

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
2 hours ago - Science

The rise of military space powers

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Nations around the world are shoring up their defensive and offensive capabilities in space — for today's wars and tomorrow's.

Why it matters: Using space as a warfighting domain opens up new avenues for technologically advanced nations to dominate their enemies. But it can also make those countries more vulnerable to attack in novel ways.