Mar 28, 2024 - Business

Texas attorney general opens investigation into Boeing supplier

Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc. signage on a Boeing 737 fuselage outside the Boeing Co. manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington, US, on Monday, Feb. 5, 2024.

Spirit AeroSystems Holdings Inc. signage on a Boeing 737 fuselage outside the Boeing Co. manufacturing facility in Renton, Washington, in February. Photo: David Ryder/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton opened an investigation into Boeing supplier Spirit AeroSystems on Thursday, citing "reoccurring issues with certain airplane parts" provided to the aircraft maker.

Why it matters: Both Boeing and Spirit AeroSystems have faced scrutiny in recent months over safety and quality issues.

  • "On certain models of the 737, apparent manufacturing defects have led to numerous concerning or dangerous incidents, some of which occurred in-air," per a statement from the Texas attorney general's office.

Context: The mid-air incident occurred in January, when an emergency exit door flew off an Alaska Airlines flight, causing the temporary grounding of all 737 MAX 9 planes in U.S. territory.

  • Boeing reported last month that it had to undertake more work on some 50 undelivered 737 MAX jets after its supplier identified misdrilled holes on some fuselages.

What they're saying: Paxton said in a statement Thursday the "potential risks associated with certain airplane models are deeply concerning and potentially life-threatening to Texans."

  • Spirit AeroSystems spokesperson Joe Buccino said in an emailed statement Thursday night that while he wouldn't comment on any investigations, "we are wholly focused on providing our customers with the best quality product."
  • A spokesperson for Boeing declined to comment on the matter.

Zoom out: Boeing announced Monday that CEO Dave Calhoun will leave his position at the end of this year in the wake of safety issues.

  • Boeing is in talks to acquire Spirit AeroSystems because it said earlier this month it believes that reintegrating manufacturing operations improve quality and "further strengthen aviation safety."

Go deeper: The Boeing union wants a board seat and a say on plane safety

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