Updated Jan 12, 2024 - Business

Alaska Airlines passengers sue Boeing over 737 MAX 9 incident

An NTSB investigator on Jan. 7 examines the fuselage plug area of the Boeing 737 MAX 9 that flew Alaska Airlines Flight 1282.

An NTSB investigator on Jan. 7 examines the fuselage plug area of the Boeing 737 MAX 9 that flew Alaska Airlines Flight 1282. Photo: National Transportation Safety Board

Alaska Airlines passengers are suing Boeing in Washington after a "plugged" emergency exit door flew off mid-air on Flight 1282 last week that resulted in the grounding of all 737 MAX 9 planes in U.S. territory.

The big picture: A Seattle company filed the lawsuit against the aircraft maker on behalf of six named passengers and "all others similarly situated," who were aboard the 737 MAX 9 jet last Friday, alleging "the event physically injured some passengers and emotionally traumatized most if not all aboard."

Of note: After the door plug detached and "shot off," the "force of the depressurization ripped the shirt off a boy, and sucked cell phones, other debris, and much of the oxygen out of the aircraft," alleges the lawsuit, which is seeking a trial to determine the damage amounts.

  • "The shirtless boy leapt over the woman next to him, and escaped toward the front of the plane. At least two others seated near the hole followed and found new seats closer to the front."

Zoom out: A federal investigation was launched into the incident and the Federal Aviation Administration last Saturday ordered all Boeing 737 MAX 9 planes operated by U.S. airlines or in U.S. territory to be temporarily grounded, pending safety inspections.

  • When asked for comment on the lawsuit, a Boeing spokesperson said on Thursday night the company had "nothing to add."

Flashback: Boeing urges airlines to inspect planes for possible loose bolt

Editor's note: This article has been updated with new details throughout.

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