Updated Jan 12, 2023 - Economy & Business

Consumer prices fell in December as inflation continues to cool

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics

U.S. consumers got a reprieve from soaring costs in December: the Consumer Price Index declined on a monthly basis, the first drop since last summer as falling prices for items including gasoline and used cars dragged the overall index down.

By the numbers: The index, which captures price changes across a basket of consumer goods and services, fell 0.1%, following an increase by the same amount in November. Over the past 12 months ending in December, the index is up 6.5%, falling from 7.1% through November.

  • Core CPI, which excludes food and fuel costs, rose by 0.3% last month. Over the last 12 months through December, the index rose 5.7%. In November, those figures were 0.2% and 6%, respectively.

Why it matters: The hot inflation that persisted through much of last year continues to show signs of receding — offering at least some relief for shoppers, the White House and the Federal Reserve, though some underlying inflation pressure remains.

Where it stands: The data caps a year in which consumer prices rose rapidly, though the pace of cost increases began to slow in the final months of the year.

  • As consumers shifted spending and supply chains began to heal, price increases for a range of goods have cooled or, in some cases, costs have fallen outright.

Between the lines: The Federal Reserve, which has been raising interest rates aggressively to tame inflation, is watching the services sector closely, where inflation can be more challenging to stamp out.

  • A sub-index measuring price moves within the services category (excluding housing) accelerated by 0.4%, after two straight months of cooler readings
  • Still, in the 12 months through December, this sub-index is up 7.4% (compared to 7.3% in November).
Go deeper