Oct 28, 2022 - Politics & Policy

Jan. 6 committee members' cash surge

Data: Federal Election Commission, Axios research; Chart: Tory Lysik/Axios

Of the seven members of the Jan. 6 select committee who ran for reelection this cycle, five already raised more money as of Sept. 30 than they did in the last cycle — in some cases by staggering margins.

Why it matters: The data highlights what will likely be one of the lasting impacts of the panel even after it disbands at the end of the year: significantly enhancing the political star power of some of its members.

By the numbers: Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-Md.) more than doubled his haul from the last cycle, raising $4.3 million in the last two years compared to $2.1 million in the 2020 campaign.

  • Raskin, a safe seat, third-term member who is running for the top spot on the House Oversight Committee, is seen as a rising star in the party. He was an impeachment manager during the second Trump impeachment trial in 2021.
  • Rep. Elaine Luria (D-Va.), a swing-seat member and prodigious fundraiser, raised $2.1 million more in the 2022 election than in 2020.
  • Rep. Adam Schiff (D-Calif.) achieved Democratic stardom during the Trump years, first as the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee and then as an impeachment manager in the first trial in 2019. He still topped his 2020 haul.
  • And Rep. Pete Aguilar (D-Calif.), who is the vice chair of the House Democratic Caucus, raised half a million more than he did last cycle.

The big picture: Some of this stardom goes beyond just personal fundraising — much to the benefit of House Democrats' campaign.

  • Raskin and Schiff, both leading anti-Trump voices in the party, have cut ads for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and lent their personal brands to texts and fundraising emails.
  • Aguilar, meanwhile, has paid at least $1 million in dues to the DCCC, according to a spreadsheet reported by Punchbowl. Schiff has paid $700,000, while Raskin has paid $350,000.

Yes, but: Not every cash explosion can be solely attributed to the members' heightened stature as committee members.

  • Leadership ambitions are likely fueling some members' fundraising boon. Schiff is rumored to be plotting a bid for the Democratic leadership if House Speaker Nancy Pelosi steps down after the election, while Aguilar is expected to vie for the No. 3 spot.
  • And Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), the vice chair of the committee, faced easily the most competitive primary of her career since she was first elected in 2016, losing in a landslide to Trump-backed challenger Harriet Hageman.

Remember: The data for the 2022 cycle only covers Federal Election Commission filings up to Sept. 30, meaning these members still have another five weeks worth of fundraising to pad their 2022 figures.

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