Oct 25, 2020 - Science

In photos: Washington state crews destroy first murder hornets nest in U.S.

 Washington State Department of Agriculture workers, wearing protective suits remove a vacuum a nest of Asian giant hornets from a tree on October 24, 2020, in Blaine, Washington.
Washington State Department of Agriculture workers, illuminated by red lamps, vacuum a nest of Asian giant hornets from a tree in Blaine, Washington, on Saturday. Photo: Elaine Thompson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

Heavily protected crews on Saturday dismantled the first Asian giant hornet nest found in the U.S., the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) confirmed in a statement declaring: "Got 'em."

The big picture: The invasive species commonly referred to as the "murder hornet," typically doesn't harm humans unless provoked, though it has been known to kill people in Japan. The insect poses a major threat to local honeybee populations. But the WSDA said in a statement that the nest removal "appears to have been successful."

A scientist displays a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him on October 24, 2020, in Blaine, Washington.
Sven Spichiger, WSDA managing entomologist, with a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him in Blaine. Photo: Elaine Thompson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images
A Washington State Department of Agriculture workers holds two of the dozens of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a tree on October 24, 2020, in Blaine, Washington.
A WSDA worker holds two of the hornets, which can deliver painful stings to people and spit venom. Photo: Elaine Thompson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images
Neighbors look on in the early morning hours as Washington State Department of Agriculture workers vacuum a nest of Asian giant hornets from a tree on October 24, 2020, in Blaine, Washington.
Neighbors watch workers vacuum the nest, discovered earlier in the week after crews spent weeks searching, trapping and using dental floss to tie tracking devices to the hornets. Photo: Elaine Thompson/Pool/AFP via Getty Images
Jenni Cena, pest biologist and trapping supervisor from the WSDA, sets a trap designed to catch the murder hornets in Bellingham, Washington, in July.
Jenni Cena, pest biologist and trapping supervisor from the WSDA, sets a trap designed to catch the murder hornets in Bellingham, Washington, in July. Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

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