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Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg is funneling more than a third of his massive advertising war chest into the 14 states voting on Super Tuesday, data from Advertising Analytics shows.

Why it matters: While most candidates are focusing their dollars and efforts on early primary states, the Democratic presidential candidate has his eyes set on the states he thinks he can win — and those with the most delegates.

Expand chart
Data: Advertising Analytics; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Details: 35% of Bloomberg's ad money has been spent on the four states with the largest number of Democratic delegates — California, New York, Texas and Florida. Nearly half has been spent on Super Tuesday and Rust Belt states.

  • Meanwhile, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg, Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren have spent more than half of all their ad dollars since last January on early voting states.
  • Biden and Warren were forced to scramble and shift money to New Hampshire as poor Iowa results rolled in, AP reported. Biden is struggling to raise money to last until states with more diverse demographics begin voting.
"While other campaigns have been focused on Iowa, we’ve been building an operation of political and organizing talent across the country that is unmatched and laying the groundwork in the states critical to defeating Trump in November."
— Statement by Bloomberg's 2020 States director, Dan Kanninen

The big picture: Bloomberg's team has also been invested on the ground, hiring staff and setting up offices in every Super Tuesday state, according to the campaign. They aim to have conversations with 10 million voters before Super Tuesday.

Yes, but: While skipping the early primary states ensures that the presidential nominee comes out unscathed ahead of Super Tuesday, it also means Bloomberg has missed out on potentially building more earned media support nationally. 

  • Buttigieg, for example, saw a bump in national polls after Iowa. He was polling fourth in New Hampshire right before the first 2020 caucus. Now, he's polling second, just 5 points behind Sanders, according to FiveThirtyEight.

Early states missed out on the Bloomberg money surge.

  • Total campaign spending on tv, radio and satellite ads on the Iowa caucus fell from 2016 to 2020. This was in part due to the decline in super PACs this election cycle, according to Steve Passwaiter, VP of political advertising at Kantar Media/CMAG, an ad measurement firm.
  • It didn't help that Bloomberg largely skipped over the state.

Go deeper: Bloomberg's big bet on the power of money

Go deeper

Democrats to take up immigration reform next week

Biden in the Oval Office in January. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House will vote on two immigration bills next week, including one to protect undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said Tuesday on a call with the Democratic caucus.

Why it matters: This is likely the only realistic shot the Biden administration has at this point to pass immigration reform.

Scoop: Biden briefing calls for 20,000 child migrant beds

President Biden, during a virtual meeting with Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador. Photo: Anna Moneymaker-Pool/Getty Images

A briefing scheduled for President Biden this afternoon outlines the need for 20,000 beds to shelter an expected crush of child migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, Axios has learned.

Why it matters: The rapid influx of unaccompanied children is building into the administration's first new crisis. A presentation created by the Domestic Policy Council spells out the dimensions with nearly 40 slides full of charts and details.

FBI director: Jan. 6 Capitol attack was domestic terrorism

The FBI views the Jan. 6 Capitol siege as an act of domestic terrorism, director Christopher Wray testified in his opening statement Tuesday before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Why it matters: The FBI's designation of the attack as domestic terrorism puts the perpetrators "on the same level with ISIS and homegrown violent extremists," Wray said.