Zuckerberg, speaking at the F8 conference in 2017. Photo: Facebook

Facebook held a meeting Tuesday where employees could ask questions about the Cambridge Analytica issue, but neither CEO Mark Zuckerberg nor COO Sheryl Sandberg were there to offer answers, according to The Daily Beast and Bloomberg. Rather, the meeting was run by deputy general counsel Paul Grewal.

Why it matters: Lots of people want answers, including Facebook's employees, and the company's top two executives have remained conspicuously silent thus far.

Grewal, a former federal magistrate judge, was also the author of Facebook's Friday statement that it was suspending Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook declined to comment on the meeting or who attended, but said in a statement:

Mark, Sheryl and their teams are working around the clock to get all the facts and take the appropriate action moving forward, because they understand the seriousness of this issue. The entire company is outraged we were deceived. We are committed to vigorously enforcing our policies to protect people’s information and will take whatever steps are required to see that this happens.

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Gulf Coast braces for Zeta after storm strengthens into hurricane

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Louisiana Gov. Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane and threatened Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as it moved towards the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The state of play: Zeta was expected to make landfall on the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula Monday night, bringing with it a "dangerous storm surge" and "heavy rainfall" as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico, the National Hurricane Service said.

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Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.