Jun 13, 2017

YouTube strikes deal with music creators over performance rights

Youtube Rego Korosi via Flickr CC

YouTube has come to a multi-year agreement with the trade group that represents music creatives to ensure music creators, publishers and songwriters are fairly compensated for the use of their music on YouTube. The agreement leverages YouTube's data exchange and the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP)'s music database to better identify proprietary works on YouTube to be able to create more monetization opportunities and transparency for artists.

Why it matters: The partnership is one of a few steps YouTube has taken to ensure it maintains a good relationship with the publishers that it relies on for popular content distribution. Similar efforts are being made by other major content distributors, like Apple News, Facebook, etc., to ensure that publishers continue to find value in sharing their content on big platforms.

Publisher priorities: YouTube has taken action in the past to ensure it doesn't disrupt its relationships with the music industry. The tech giant settled with a different body, the National Music Publishers Association, in December over unpaid music royalties following backlash for allowing users to post artists' work without proper licensing and attribution and not removing that content quickly enough. YouTube announced in December that it paid out over $1 billion over the course of a year to the music industry from advertising alone.

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America's future looks a lot like Nevada

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Today's Nevada caucus will foreshadow the future of American politics well beyond 2020.

Why it matters: The U.S. is in the midst of a demographic transformation, and the country's future looks a lot like Nevada's present. Today's results, in addition to shaping the 2020 race, will help tell us where politics is headed in a rapidly changing country.

Coronavirus spreads to more countries, and U.S. ups its case count

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens.

The novel coronavirus continues to spread to more nations, and the U.S. reports a doubling of its confirmed cases to 34 — while noting those are mostly due to repatriated citizens, emphasizing there's no "community spread" yet in the U.S. Meanwhile, Italy reported its first virus-related death on Friday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed at least 2,359 people and infected more than 77,000 others, mostly in mainland China. New countries to announce infections recently include Israel, Lebanon and Iran.

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