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YouTube announces crackdown on conspiracy theories

Photo: Mateusz Wlodarczyk/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Youtube is introducing a new feature to help battle conspiracy theories that spread through videos on its platform, CEO Susan Wojcicki announced at South by Southwest Wednesday, according to Bloomberg.

Why it matters: YouTube has struggled to contain misinformation that spreads easily through automated distribution of videos within its feed. The company has faced pressure from advertisers and policymakers to curb the amount of misinformation on the platform that has led to discord and confusion.

How it works: According to Wojcicki, YouTube will work with Wikipedia to show alternate text with facts debunking conspiracy theories, like the one that spread after the Parkland shooting that student survivors were paid actors.

  • The Google-owned subsidiary of Alphabet will start with a list of well-known conspiracy theories to tackle and will work from there.
  • Sources tell BuzzFeed that this is not meant to be a full-scale solution to the problem.
  • Wikipedia is a crowdsourced information website, and has some credibility issues of its own.
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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 8 hours ago
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How Trump delivered on Obama promises — big time

Donald Trump.
Photo: Cheriss May / NurPhoto via Getty Images

The $1.3 trillion spending deal that President Trump signed on Friday expands many of President Obama's priorities, despite his previous proposals to do the exact opposite, Politico's Michael Grunwald notes.

The big picture: Most of Congress didn't really read it; Trump threatened to veto the bill yesterday, and ended up signing it anyway. He said he would never sign a bill like that again, but it was too late: a White House official told Axios' Mike Allen that Trump's signing led to "the hardest I've ever seen the base turn on Trump over anything."