Oct 12, 2018

The rise of the young black voter

Almost two-thirds of black Americans say they are "absolutely certain to vote," according to a new survey by The Atlantic and PRRI. And at higher numbers than white or Hispanic youths, black Americans say their close friends are voting, too.

Why it matters: Barack Obama triggered a surge of votes from black Americans in 2008 and 2012, giving him the edge in several states. President Trump could have a similar effect in the Nov. 6 mid-terms — although for the opposite reason

In other results from the survey:

  • 74% of young black Americans see Trump unfavorably.
  • 83% of registered black American voters would support a Democrat over a Republican.
  • But, "African Americans are less likely to say over the last two years they’ve become more civically engaged. They’re less likely to say they’ve considered running for office, and less likely than whites to say they’re likely to consider a career in government," Robert P. Jones, CEO of PRRI, told The Atlantic.

What to watch: Women across the board are more likely to be civically or politically engaged. More than a quarter of young women say they are more interested in political and civic activities than they were in 2016, compared with just 17% of young men.

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Why 50+ women care about 2020

Data: AARP/Harris Poll; Chart: Axios Visuals

A new AARP survey by the Harris Poll examined what's driving women 50 and older ahead of next year's elections and found health care on top. The survey also found that older women’s concerns about Trump are eroding, but not upending, his support with Republicans and independents.

Why it matters: As the House of Representatives prepares to impeach the president, the priorities for this group of high-propensity voters are closer to home and different from what their male counterparts care most about.

Go deeperArrowDec 18, 2019

Women outpace men on U.S. payrolls

Data: Bureau of Labor Statistics; Note: Men count was derived by subtracting women count from total; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

There are more women on American payrolls than men as of the latest U.S. jobs report.

Why it matters: The data reflects a hiring boom in industries that are female-dominated, while sectors that are more likely to employ men are lagging in job gains. The last time women overtook men in payrolls was “during a stretch between June 2009 and April 2010,” according to the Wall Street Journal, which first reported the milestone.

Go deeperArrowJan 10, 2020

Law enforcement's rising problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The latest and greatest tool for law enforcement has an existential problem.

Driving the news: A major federal study found "Asian and African American people were up to 100 times as likely to be misidentified than white men," per the Washington Post. It also found "high error rates for 'one-to-one' searches of Asians, African Americans, Native Americans and Pacific Islanders."

Go deeperArrowDec 19, 2019