Yelp has been one of Google's main antagonists. Photo: Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Yelp is breathing new life into its antitrust fight against Google, filing a complaint in Europe with the EU's competition secretary and launching an ad-driven advocacy campaign targeting Google employees about how their design decisions pull business and traffic from smaller sites, like Yelp and TripAdvisor.

Why it matters: With an uptick in concerns about Big Tech, Yelp clearly sees blood in the water and wants to ramp up its longtime campaign against Google, which it thinks uses its search dominance to unfairly undermine Yelp (and other companies') services. A Google spokesperson declined to comment on the new push, which is largely an extension of existing efforts.

Yelp had a victory when European regulators levied a $2.7 billion fine last year over allegations that Google abused its search dominance to influence shopping practices, not traffic to Yelp or other local-focused websites.

Yes, but: In the US, however, concerns about Google search have gotten less traction. In 2013 the Federal Trade Commission ended an investigation into Google search with an agreement that only required the company to make some changes.

The bigger picture: Antitrust concerns about Big Tech are having a moment. 60 Minutes looked at the Google issues this past weekend, a coalition of progressive groups just called for the FTC to break up Facebook and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin said the Justice Department should look at the growing power of tech companies.

Go deeper

Congress' next moves to rein in Big Tech

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

After grilling the CEOs of Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple last week, members of Congress are grappling with whether to accuse any of the firms of illegal anticompetitive behavior, to propose updating federal antitrust laws — or both.

The big picture: Congress is just one arm of government making the case against these companies. Google is expected to be the first of the firms to face possible antitrust litigation from the Justice Department before summer's end, but all four face a full-court press of investigations by DOJ, the Federal Trade Commission and state attorneys general.

Fauci: Coronavirus task force to examine aerosolized spread


A sneeze. Photo: Maartje van Caspel/Getty Images

The White House coronavirus task force will examine more closely just how much SARS-CoV-2 might be transmitted via aerosols, and not just from droplets, NIAID director Anthony Fauci said Wednesday at an online forum sponsored by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Why it matters: The longer the coronavirus can remain infectious in the air, the more likely it can infect people, particularly indoors — leading to the possible need to alter air filtration and circulation within buildings.

The next wave to hit Main Street

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Call it the great retail wash. A wave of defaults, bankruptcies and evictions expected in cities across the U.S. is poised to remake the retail landscape across the country, but there may be some upside for consumers and small businesses.

Why it matters: Rather than an overnight descent into a collection of urban wastelands full of Starbucks, Amazon fulfillment centers, Chase bank branches and nothing else, the coronavirus pandemic and resulting retail apocalypse may just mean that, in major U.S. cities, less is more.