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Data: Axios research; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Out of the 50 largest U.S. cities, only 15 have female mayors. That proportion stays the same when looking at the largest 100 cities: 70% of mayors are men.

The big picture: Women are running for office at every level of government. Although Elizabeth Warren's withdrawal effectively ended the chance of electing a woman to the presidency this year, there's progress elsewhere.

  • Congress counted its highest number of women after the 2018 elections and, as of last month, 584 women were running or likely to run in House races, an increase from 437 two years ago, per the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.

Yes, but: Men still far outnumber women as mayors.

  • Women I spoke with this week at the National League of Cities conference told me it's not out of lack of interest. Many women are very engaged in their communities and are passionate about making them better.
  • At the municipal level, there are plenty of ways to have an impact outside of the mayors' office. Women are represented on city councils, county commissions, school boards, and the offices of city managers and economic development.

What to watch: Female mayors, while still in the minority, are recognizable names in municipal politics.

  • Seattle's Jenny Durkan, Chicago's Lori Lightfoot, Tampa's Jane Castor and Washington, D.C.'s Muriel Bowser, for example, are getting attention for tackling tough problems.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
8 mins ago - Energy & Environment

Biden's emerging climate orbit

Photo illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

As of Tuesday morning, we know a lot more about President-elect Joe Biden climate personnel orbit, even as picks for agencies like EPA and DOE are outstanding, so here are a few early conclusions.

Why it matters: They're the highest-level names yet announced who will have a role in what Biden is promising will be a far-reaching climate and energy agenda.

Janet Yellen is back

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Hannelore Foerster/Getty Images

A face familiar to Wall Street is back as a central player that this time will need to steer the country out of a deep economic crisis.

Driving the news: President-elect Joe Biden is preparing to nominate former Fed chair Janet Yellen to be Treasury secretary.

Mike Allen, author of AM
2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Charles Koch: I "screwed up"

In his first on-camera interview in four years, Charles Koch told "Axios on HBO" that he "screwed up by being partisan," rather than approaching his network's big-spending political action in a more nonpartisan way.

Why it matters: Koch — chairman and CEO of Koch Industries, which Forbes yesterday designated as America's largest private company — has been the left's favorite face of big-spending political action.