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Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Joe Biden's presidential campaign is launching the "Women for Biden" group today in its latest effort to target specific voters ahead of the primaries next year.

Why it matters: Female voters and candidates helped Democrats win races at all levels across the country in the 2018 midterms. Biden's campaign is hoping to extend that trend into 2020 and highlight how he'd fight against "Trump's war on women," as the campaign put it.

Details: Women for Biden is led by nearly 60 women from 16 states, including Iowa, Florida, Arizona, California, Utah and Colorado.

  • The surrogates will host fundraising events, women-to-women phone banks and other campaign events.
  • The campaign hopes this group will help build "a grassroots movement to reach out to and organize women voters to help Joe Biden become the Democratic nominee and defeat Donald Trump," per Adonna Biel, the campaign's deputy press secretary.
  • While Sen. Elizabeth Warren is within striking distance of Biden in the polls, he currently has a 10-point lead over her among female voters, per Morning Consult.

What they're saying: "Everything is at stake in this election, and winning is going to take us all coming together, knocking on doors, making calls, and reaching out to our mothers and sisters and friends to get them involved, too,” said Denise Bauer, executive director of Women for Biden.

Go deeper: Watch the launch video here

Go deeper

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.