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A Wisconsin appeals court on Tuesday blocked a judge's decision to immediately purge as many as 209,000 names from the state's voter registration rolls, the AP reports.

Why it matters: The ruling "effectively hit the pause button on the fast-moving case and means there will be no immediate change to the state’s voter registration rolls," AP notes. The ruling is considered a win for Democrats who are hoping to take back the battleground state in the 2020 elections. Candidate Donald Trump in 2016 carried Wisconsin by less than 23,000 votes, per the New York Times.

  • The lawsuit — brought by a conservative law group — argued the state elections commission broke the law by keeping the names of voters who failed to respond within 30 days to a mailer asking whether they'd moved. It further suggested the purge was necessary to guarantee election integrity and maintain an accurate voter list, the Times writes.
  • "Because voters who moved were concentrated in more Democratic parts of the state, liberals argued that the lawsuit was meant to lower turnout on their side," the AP reports.

Go deeper: Judge authorizes purge of 300,000 from Georgia voter rolls

Go deeper

Updated 3 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 a.m. ET: 31,346,086 — Total deaths: 965,294— Total recoveries: 21,518,790Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 6,858,130 — Total deaths: 199,890 — Total recoveries: 2,615,949 — Total tests: 95,841,281Map.
  3. Health: CDC says it mistakenly published guidance about COVID-19 spreading through air.
  4. Media: Conservative blogger who spread COVID-19 misinformation worked for Fauci's agency.
  5. Politics: House Democrats file legislation to fund government through Dec. 11.
  6. World: U.K. upgrades COVID alert level as Europe sees worrying rise in infections — "The Wake-Up Call" warns the West about the consequences of mishandling a pandemic.
1 hour ago - Technology

Why Puerto Rico is still struggling to get online

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Internet connectivity remains a weak link for the disaster-wracked U.S. territory Puerto Rico, and some experts fear a new tranche of Federal Communications Commission subsidies set aside just for the island might not help the people most in need of a broadband connection.

Why it matters: Puerto Rico is locked out of most federal funding available to U.S. states to help expand internet service. The island risks being left behind as carriers expand and upgrade high-speed internet networks elsewhere, even as infrastructure-damaging tropical storms come faster and harder and the pandemic makes broadband even more of a must-have.

The price of Washington's stimulus failure

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

America's elected representatives have failed America.

Why it matters: The bipartisan inability to deliver economic stimulus could impede economic growth for months to come. It will create widespread damage across America — from small businesses to large industries to schools and day cares — and leave many Americans without jobs or homes.

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