Sep 14, 2017

Why Apple might plow $3 billion into Toshiba's chip business

Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

Apple is close to investing upwards of $3 billion for a stake in Toshiba's chip business, per Bloomberg. That would be as much more than the company spent on its biggest-ever acquisition, Beats Electronics. But in many ways, this would be less surprising than that deal. Apple declined to comment.

  • While Apple doesn't generally do big acquisitions, securing component supply is an area where Apple is known for spending big. So, the notion that the company might be willing to invest $3 billion for a minority stake isn't actually so crazy.
  • Right now the company is highly dependent on Samsung, a key rival, for memory chips.
  • But: A Toshiba deal wouldn't end apple's reliance on Samsung. The Korean electronics giant also manufactures some of Apples other chips and is likely the main supplier of the OLED screen for the iPhone X.

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Trump to install loyalist Ric Grenell as acting intelligence chief

Photo: Sylvain Gaboury/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images

President Trump confirmed in a tweet Wednesday night that he will install Richard Grenell, the current U.S. ambassador to Germany and a staunch defender of the president, as the acting director of national intelligence.

Why it matters: The role, which was originally vacated by Dan Coats in August 2019, is one of grave responsibility. As acting DNI, Grenell will be charged with overseeing and integrating the U.S. intelligence community and will advise the president and the National Security Council on intelligence matters that concern national security.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 6 mins ago - Politics & Policy

What to watch in the Nevada debate

Photo Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Cengiz Yardages and Mario Tama/Getty Images

Michael Bloomberg's wealth will fuel rather than shield him from tests and attacks when he makes his Democratic primary debate debut on the stage tonight in Las Vegas.

The state of play: Bernie Sanders is still the front-runner. So the other candidates must weigh which of the two presents a bigger threat to their viability: Sanders, with his combined delegate, polling and grassroots momentum? Or Bloomberg, with his bottomless budget?

Go deeperArrowUpdated 12 mins ago - Politics & Policy

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