Marcio Jose Sanchez / AP

Apple is close to investing upwards of $3 billion for a stake in Toshiba's chip business, per Bloomberg. That would be as much more than the company spent on its biggest-ever acquisition, Beats Electronics. But in many ways, this would be less surprising than that deal. Apple declined to comment.

  • While Apple doesn't generally do big acquisitions, securing component supply is an area where Apple is known for spending big. So, the notion that the company might be willing to invest $3 billion for a minority stake isn't actually so crazy.
  • Right now the company is highly dependent on Samsung, a key rival, for memory chips.
  • But: A Toshiba deal wouldn't end apple's reliance on Samsung. The Korean electronics giant also manufactures some of Apples other chips and is likely the main supplier of the OLED screen for the iPhone X.

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Updated 25 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 20,952,811 — Total deaths: 760,235— Total recoveries: 13,015,397Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9 a.m. ET: 5,254,878 — Total deaths: 167,253 — Total recoveries: 1,774,648 — Total tests: 64,831,306Map.
  3. Health: The pandemic's toll on mental health — The kids who are most at risk.
  4. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  5. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Economic data turns unreliable.

How small businesses got stiffed by the coronavirus pandemic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The story of American businesses in the coronavirus pandemic is a tale of two markets — one made up of tech firms and online retailers as winners awash in capital, and another of brick-and-mortar mom-and-pop shops that is collapsing.

Why it matters: The coronavirus pandemic has created an environment where losing industries like traditional retail and hospitality as well as a sizable portion of firms owned by women, immigrants and people of color are wiped out and may be gone for good.

Apple's antitrust fight turns Epic

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Millions of angry gamers may soon join the chorus of voices calling for an antitrust crackdown on Apple, as the iPhone giant faces a new lawsuit and PR blitz from Epic Games, maker of mega-hit Fortnite.

Why it matters: Apple is one of several Big Tech firms accused of violating the spirit, if not the letter, of antitrust law. A high-profile lawsuit could become a roadmap for either building a case against tech titans under existing antitrust laws or writing new ones better suited to the digital economy.