Congress and Special Counsel Robert Mueller are looking into Russian interference with the 2016 presidential election. Here's who they're talking to, according to media reports:

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Photos: Associated Press; Chart: Chris Canipe / Axios
FBI:
  • Paul Manafort: Trump's former campaign chairman is under investigation by the FBI and Congress as part of the Russia Probe, per the Washington Post. Manafort resigned from the Trump campaign on Aug. 19 after the New York Times broke news of his dealings with Russian and Ukrainian oligarchs. Mueller is also investigating Manafort, AP reported.
  • Michael Flynn: Trump's ex-National Security Adviser lied about meetings with Russians and was a subject of the FBI's Russia investigation. Former FBI Director James Comey later testified that Trump told him to "[let] Flynn go"
  • Nigel Farage: The FBI is looking into Farage, Trump ally and Brexit leader, because of his link to the president and Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, according to the Guardian.
Special Counsel:
  • President Trump: The Post broke news on June 14 that Mueller was investigating the president for possible obstruction of justice, which Trump later confirmed via Twitter (though his aides later said the Tweet wasn't a confirmation.)
  • Jared Kushner: The next day, June 15, the Post reported that Mueller was looking into Kushner's business dealings and finances as part of the Russia probe. The New York Times reported Monday that Kushner is bolstering his legal team.
  • Vice President Pence: On June 15, the Post reported that Pence hired an outside lawyer in anticipation of Mueller's investigation.
Senate Intelligence Committee:
  • Carter Page: On May 9, the Senate committee asked Page, a former Trump aide, to provide records of his interactions with a Russian spy, per CNN. Prior to that, the FBI was monitoring Page's communications.
  • Roger Stone: Trump's close ally told Bloomberg TV on May 12 that he was "anxious" to testify publicly in front of the Senate and House committees about his contacts with Russia.
  • Jeff Sessions: Attorney General Sessions testified in front of the Senate committee on June 13 and vehemently denied allegations of collusion with the Kremlin.
  • Konstantin Kilimnik: The Post reported Monday that Kilimnik "is of interest" to Senate investigators leading the Russia probe. Kilimnik, who managed Manafort's consulting company in Kiev, told the Post that he met with the ex-campaign chairman twice while he worked for Trump.
House Intelligence Committee:
  • Michael Caputo: The House Intelligence Committee asked Caputo, the Trump campaign's communications adviser, to cooperate with their investigation on May 9, per the New York Times.
  • Boris Epshteyn: The former White House communications director told ABC he was asked by the House committee to provide testimony.
  • Michael Cohen: Bloomberg reported that the House asked Trump's personal lawyer to testify on Sept. 5.

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