Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Andrew Harnik / AP

President Trump is being investigated by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for possible obstruction of justice, the Washington Post reports, citing officials.

Why it matters: As the Russia probe has deepened, the White House line has consistently been that Trump himself is not under investigation. That's no longer the case. Trump is being investigated for his actions as they relate to the investigation, though, not for contacts with Russia.

Timing: Within days of Trump firing James Comey on May 9, the FBI began investigating Trump, officials said.

A spokesman for Trump's lawyer said, "The FBI leak of information regarding the President is outrageous, inexcusable and illegal."

The Comey factor: In his testimony last week, James Comey refused to state whether he believed Trump's request to shut down the investigation into former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn amounted to obstruction of justice — saying it was a question for Mueller — but said he took Trump's statement that he hoped the FBI would stop investigating Flynn as "a direction."

Mueller's job safety: The NY Times reported Tuesday night that Trump has discussed firing Mueller, but has been advised against it by aides. Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein would have to give the order to fire him, and has said he won't do so without cause. Per the Times:

"The president was pleased by the ambiguity of his position on Mr. Mueller, and thinks the possibility of being fired will focus the veteran prosecutor on delivering what the president desires most: a blanket public exoneration."

What's next: Director of National Intelligence Coats and NSA head Rogers have agreed to be interviewed as part of Mueller's investigation as early as next week.

Another focus: Per the Post, "Investigators have also been looking for any evidence of possible financial crimes among Trump associates."

Go deeper: There are a wide variety of actions that could be considered obstruction, but only if they're shown to have been done for nefarious reasons, and the Dept. of Justice argues that a sitting president cannot be indicted. Read more.

Go deeper

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.

The perils of organizing underground

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Researchers see one bright spot as far-right extremists turn to private and encrypted online platforms: Friction.

Between the lines: For fringe organizers, those platforms may provide more security than open social networks, but they make it harder to recruit new members.

Resurrecting Martin Luther King's office

King points to Selma, Alabama on a map at his Southern Christian Leadership Conference office in Atlanta in January 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Contributor

Efforts to save the office where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., planned some of the most important moments of the civil rights movement are hitting roadblocks amid a political stalemate.

Why it matters: The U.S. Park Service needs to OK agreements so a developer restoring the historic Prince Hall Masonic Lodge in Atlanta — which once housed King's Southern Christian Leadership Conference — can tap into private funding and begin work.