Andrew Harnik / AP

President Trump is being investigated by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for possible obstruction of justice, the Washington Post reports, citing officials.

Why it matters: As the Russia probe has deepened, the White House line has consistently been that Trump himself is not under investigation. That's no longer the case. Trump is being investigated for his actions as they relate to the investigation, though, not for contacts with Russia.

Timing: Within days of Trump firing James Comey on May 9, the FBI began investigating Trump, officials said.

A spokesman for Trump's lawyer said, "The FBI leak of information regarding the President is outrageous, inexcusable and illegal."

The Comey factor: In his testimony last week, James Comey refused to state whether he believed Trump's request to shut down the investigation into former National Security Advisor Michael Flynn amounted to obstruction of justice — saying it was a question for Mueller — but said he took Trump's statement that he hoped the FBI would stop investigating Flynn as "a direction."

Mueller's job safety: The NY Times reported Tuesday night that Trump has discussed firing Mueller, but has been advised against it by aides. Deputy A.G. Rod Rosenstein would have to give the order to fire him, and has said he won't do so without cause. Per the Times:

"The president was pleased by the ambiguity of his position on Mr. Mueller, and thinks the possibility of being fired will focus the veteran prosecutor on delivering what the president desires most: a blanket public exoneration."

What's next: Director of National Intelligence Coats and NSA head Rogers have agreed to be interviewed as part of Mueller's investigation as early as next week.

Another focus: Per the Post, "Investigators have also been looking for any evidence of possible financial crimes among Trump associates."

Go deeper: There are a wide variety of actions that could be considered obstruction, but only if they're shown to have been done for nefarious reasons, and the Dept. of Justice argues that a sitting president cannot be indicted. Read more.

Go deeper

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

Updated 9 hours ago - Health

Which states have set single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: COVID Tracking Project and state health department data compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti and Naema Ahmed/Axios

13 states this week surpassed records set just last week for their highest number of coronavirus infections in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health department data. 16 states in total reported new highs.

The big picture: The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't just due to increased testing — particularly where the number of cases has grown fastest over the last month, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens report.

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 12,389,660 — Total deaths: 557,279 — Total recoveries — 6,830,596Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 3,169,611 — Total deaths: 133,885 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.