Axios Jun 14
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Report: Trump has discussed firing Mueller

Morry Gash / AP

The NY Times reports that President Trump has contemplated firing Special Counsel Robert Mueller, but has thus far been dissuaded from doing so by staff. Among those pushing back, per the Times — Reince Priebus and Melania Trump.

  • Reasoning: Reports in Breitbart News and elsewhere have convinced Trump that Mueller is a Comey ally, and part of a "witch hunt" against him.
  • Key point: "The president was pleased by the ambiguity of his position on Mr. Mueller, and thinks the possibility of being fired will focus the veteran prosecutor on delivering what the president desires most: a blanket public exoneration."
  • Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders: "While the president has every right to, he has no intention to" fire Mueller.
  • Fact check: Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein would have to fire Mueller, and he says he won't follow orders to do so unless there is "good cause."
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Trump: Transgender people "disqualified" from the military

SecDef Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford.
Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis and Gen. Joseph Dunford. Photo: Andrew Harrer-Pool / Getty Images

President Trump late Friday issued an order disqualifying most transgender people from serving in the military.

"[T]ransgender persons with a history or diagnosis of gender dysphoria -- individuals who the policies state may require substantial medical treatment, including medications and surgery -- are disqualified from military service except under certain limited circumstances."

Why it matters: Anything short of an inclusive policy for transgender troops will be viewed as a continuation of the ban Trump announced on Twitter in August.

Haley Britzky 2 hours ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.