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Trump with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Oval Office. Photo: Olivier Douliery, Pool / Getty Images

"The Trump administration is putting the finishing touches on its long-awaited Middle East peace plan ... and President Trump is likely to present it soon, despite risking swift rejection by the Palestinians," the N.Y. Times' Mark Landler writes.

The bottom line: "[T]he most immediate challenge for the White House is how to roll it out so that it is not proclaimed dead on arrival. The Palestinians remain furious over the president’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel ... The administration is considering simply revealing the document, in the hopes that it will pressure the Palestinians."

P.S. Ahead of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's visit to the U.S. beginning a week from today, the N.Y. Times pops a stunning lead story, "Saudis Said to Use Coercion and Abuse to Seize Billions":

  • "During months of captivity, many [influential businessmen — many of them members of the royal family] were subject to coercion and physical abuse, witnesses said. In the early days of the crackdown, at least 17 detainees were hospitalized for physical abuse and one later died in custody with a neck that appeared twisted, a badly swollen body and other signs of abuse."
  • "In an email to The New York Times on Sunday, the government denied accusations of physical abuse as 'absolutely untrue.'"

Go deeper

Justice Department drops insider trading inquiry against Sen. Richard Burr

Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) walking through the Senate Subway in the U.S. Capitol in December 2020. Photo: Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images

The Department of Justice told Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.) on Tuesday that it will not move forward with insider trading charges against him.

Why it matters: The decision, first reported by the New York Times, effectively ends the DOJ's investigation into the senator's stock sell-off that occurred after multiple lawmakers were briefed about the coronavirus' potential economic toll. Burr subsequently stepped down as chair of the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Netflix tops 200 million global subscribers

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

Netflix said that it added another 8.5 million global subscribers last quarter, bringing its total number of paid subscribers globally to more than 200 million.

The big picture: Positive fourth-quarter results show Netflix's resiliency, despite increased competition and pandemic-related production headwinds.

Janet Yellen plays down debt, tax hike concerns in confirmation hearing

Treasury Secretary nominee Janet Yellen at an event in December. Photo: Alex Wong via Getty Images

Janet Yellen, Biden's pick to lead the Treasury Department, pushed back against two key concerns from Republican senators at her confirmation hearing on Tuesday: the country's debt and the incoming administration's plans to eventually raise taxes.

Driving the news: Yellen — who's expected to win confirmation — said spending big now will prevent the U.S. from having to dig out of a deeper hole later. She also said the Biden administration's priority right now is coronavirus relief, not raising taxes.