Dec 6, 2019

White House condemns impeachment inquiry ahead of participation deadline

President Trump. Photo: Chip Somodevilla / Staff/ Getty Images

White House counsel Pat Cipollone called the impeachment process a "charade" on Friday in a letter to House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, ahead of the House deadline for President Trump and his legal counsel to announce their participation in the impeachment hearings.

What they're saying: The letter emphasized that Trump is calling for House Democrats to impeach him "fast" if they're going to, so there will be "a fair trial in the Senate."

  • "If the President has no good response to the allegations, then he would not want to appear before the Committee. Having declined this opportunity, he cannot claim that the process is unfair," Nadler responded in a statement on Friday.

The big picture: House Democrats have cited the White House's blanket refusal to cooperate with the impeachment inquiry as evidence of obstruction for a potential article of impeachment.

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House Judiciary Committee announces first impeachment hearing

Jerry Nadler. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee announced Tuesday that it will hold a hearing on Dec. 4 to discuss the "historical and constitutional basis of impeachment" and the definition of an impeachable offense.

The big picture: The committee, led by Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-N.Y.) is expected to receive a report on the House Intelligence Committee's investigation into President Trump's dealings with Ukraine shortly after Thanksgiving and will ultimately be responsible for recommending articles of impeachment to be voted on by the full House. Nadler sent a letter to Trump on Tuesday inviting him and his attorneys to participate in the hearing.

Go deeperArrowNov 26, 2019

House invites Trump to participate in impeachment hearings

President Trump. Photo: MANDEL NGAN / Contributor/Getty Images

President Trump has until Dec. 6 to decide whether his legal counsel will participate in House impeachment hearings, according to a letter sent by the House Judiciary Committee on Friday outlining next steps.

Why it matters: It remains unclear whether Trump or his legal team will take part in the probe looking into allegations that he abused his power in an attempt to convince Ukraine to launch investigations into the Russia probe and the Bidens. Trump said last week that he would consider testifying in the impeachment probe, but the White House has instructed multiple witnesses not to cooperate.

Go deeperArrowNov 30, 2019

House Judiciary Committee hears impeachment evidence

Photo: Anna Moneymaker/Pool/Getty Images

The House Judiciary Committee heard the evidence behind the impeachment inquiry on Monday in a marathon nine-and-a-half hour hearing.

Why it matters: The committee is likely only days away from drafting formal articles of impeachment against President Trump — and this hearing was one of House Democrats' last chances to summarize their case against the president to the public.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Dec 9, 2019