Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on the day's biggest business stories

Subscribe to Axios Closer for insights into the day’s business news and trends and why they matter

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sign up for Axios NW Arkansas

Stay up-to-date on the most important and interesting stories affecting NW Arkansas, authored by local reporters

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Jared Kushner. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

President Trump will give an immigration speech on Thursday afternoon and will begin to unveil the immigration proposal son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner has spent months putting together, senior administration officials told reporters at the White House this afternoon.

Why it matters: The White House wants an immigration plan that can unite Republicans. It won't touch on so-called Dreamers or the undocumented immigrant population, which are important issues for Democrats. But even if the legislation goes nowhere in Congress, it'll give Trump something concrete to campaign on in 2020.

Between the lines: The legislation will change asylum processes, fund more border security and change who qualifies for a green card. Overall, the total number of green cards issued each year — roughly 1.1 million — will remain unchanged.

  • By the numbers: Administration officials claimed that the system would result in an increase of $500 billion in tax revenue by 2029, due to more immigrants who are likely to be employed in well-paid jobs.
The legal immigration system

Employment and skill-based visas would make up 57% of green cards issued under the new plan, up from just 12%, according to an analysis shown to reporters via PowerPoint.

  • Foreigners with extraordinary talents, professional or specialized workers and exceptional students would be the target for the new high-skill visa process.
  • After passing a civics tests, visa applicants would be awarded points based on their age, English proficiency, educational attainment, whether they had an offer of employment in the U.S. and how much that job would pay.

This higher number of skill-based green cards would come at the expense of the diversity lottery visa and family immigration.

  • The share of green cards given to family members of U.S. citizens would be halved under the plan. It is still unclear which family members would be impacted, but a senior administration official said that spouses and children would be a priority.

What to watch: The RAISE act, which offered a similar legal immigration system and was backed by Trump in 2017, eliminated the ability for U.S. citizens to petition for siblings, parents or children over the age of 18 years old.

At the border

The legislation would:

  • Provide physical barriers and updated technology at the border to help border patrol screen those who come through the legal ports of entry and locate those who attempt to cross illegally.
  • Streamline and expedite the asylum process, although the specifics are still unclear.
  • Raise fees required for certain permits and transactions at the border, which would fund future border upgrades.
  • According to the presentation shown to reporters, the plan would enable "prompt removal of illegal border crossers" and eliminate "magnets for illegal migration." But details were not given.

What it won't touch: Undocumented immigrants and short-term visas such as H-1Bs, which many U.S. tech companies depend on, and seasonal worker visas.

The bottom line: It's unlikely this legislation will go anywhere. A senior administration official even admitted that when it comes to the proposal becoming law, "it's very easy to be pessimistic," but they plan to try.

Go deeper

CCP releases two jailed Canadians after Huawei CFO deal with DOJ

Photo: Sheldon Cooper/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Two Canadians imprisoned by the Chinese government for over 1,000 days have been released and are expected to arrive in Canada on Saturday, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said Friday.

Why it matters: Their release comes hours after Huawei Technologies CFO Meng Wanzhou reached a deal with the U.S. Department of Justice that resolves the criminal charges against her and could pave the way for her to return to China.

Updated 18 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Arizona GOP's private recount of 2020 election confirms Biden's win

Contractors working on behalf of the GOP examine and recount 2020 ballots at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Phoenix in May. Photo: Courtney Pedroza/Getty Images

In an odd coda to the 2020 election, private contractors conducting a GOP-commissioned recount in Arizona confirmed President Biden’s win in Maricopa County.

Why it matters: The unofficial, party-driven recount has been heavily covered on cable news as part of former President Trump's continued effort to sow doubt about the election result.

Del Rio bridge camp empty following Haitian migrant surge

A boy bathes himself in a jug of water inside a migrant camp at the U.S.-Mexico border on Sept. 21 in Del Rio, Texas. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

The last migrants camping under the Del Rio International Bridge, which connects Texas and Mexico, departed on Friday, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas announced during a White House press briefing.

Driving the news: Thousands of migrants, mostly from Haiti, had arrived to the makeshift camp after crossing the southern border seeking asylum. Roughly 1,800 migrants will now head to U.S. Customs and Border Protection processing centers.

You’ve caught up. Now what?

Sign up for Mike Allen’s daily Axios AM and PM newsletters to get smarter, faster on the news that matters.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!