Updated Sep 25, 2019

Whistleblower complaint turned over to House and Senate Intel

Photo: Tom William/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

The whistleblower complaint at the heart of a controversy involving President Trump and Ukraine has been released to the House and Senate Intelligence committees, lawmakers confirmed Wednesday afternoon.

Why it matters: The Trump administration's initial refusal to turn over the complaint led to Speaker Nancy Pelosi's watershed decision on Tuesday to finally support a formal impeachment inquiry. The Washington Post and NBC News reported on Wednesday that acting director of national intelligence Joseph Maguire threatened to resign if the administration prevented him from testifying freely before Congress on Thursday. The White House and Maguire have denied these reports.

  • Maguire said in a statement Wednesday: "At no time have I considered resigning my position since assuming this role on Aug. 16, 2019. I have never quit anything in my life, and I am not going to start now."

The big picture: Earlier on Wednesday, the White House released a summary of a July call in which Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden and his son. The release did little to satisfy Democrats, with Speaker Pelosi doubling down on her call for a formal impeachment inquiry.

Go deeper: Ukraine president says he doesn't want to be involved in U.S. elections

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U.S. enters 6th day of nationwide protests over George Floyd's killing

A protest in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 31. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Protests continued across the country for the sixth day in a row on Sunday, as demonstrators called for justice in response to the deaths of George Floyd, EMT Breonna Taylor, jogger Ahmaud Arbery and countless other black Americans who have suffered at the hands of racism and police brutality.

What's happening: Protestors in D.C. broke one police barricade outside the White House on Sunday evening after reportedly demonstrating for several hours. The atmosphere was still largely peaceful as of 6pm ET.

Trump privately scolded, warned by allies

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

Over the past couple of days, numerous advisers both inside and outside the White House have urged the president to tone down his violent rhetoric, which many worry could escalate racial tensions and hurt him politically.

Behind the scenes: The biggest source of internal concern was Trump's escalatory tweet, "when the looting starts, the shooting starts." Some advisers said it could damage him severely with independent voters and suburban women.

2 hours ago - World

U.S. sends Brazil 2 million doses of hydroxychloroquine and 1,000 ventilators

President Trump and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro. Photo: Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images

The White House announced on Sunday that the U.S. has sent 2 million doses of the anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine to Brazil, and that 1,000 ventilators will soon be delivered as well as the South American country becomes the new epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: The situation in Brazil, which has reported over 498,000 cases of COVID-19 and more than 28,000 deaths, is threatening to spiral out of control as far-right President Jair Bolsonaro faces mounting criticism for downplaying the severity of the virus.