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Alex Brandon / AP

Without a spending bill, parts of the government began shutting down early Saturday for the third time this year. That means most federal services, including the Departments of State, Justice, Transportation, and Homeland Security, will close temporarily.

Why it matters: Even if you aren't a government employee, a shutdown can still affect you personally — from how your tax dollars are spent to which tourists sites you can't visit.

What could happen

420,000 federal employees will be working with delayed pay, per CNBC, including:

  • Over 41,000 law federal law enforcement officers from various departments
  • The majority of Homeland Security employees
  • Around 54,000 Customs and Border Protection employees
  • Several thousand Forest Service firefighters and National Weather Service forecasters

Another 380,000 federal employees would be furloughed, meaning they won't be going to work and won't be getting paid. This will include:

  • 96% of NASA employees
  • 86% of Commerce Department workers
  • 30% of Transportation Department employees
  • 80% of Forest and National Park Services
  • 95% of Housing and Urban Development workers

What it means for you:

  • Mail: The U.S. Postal Service is an independent agency that doesn't rely on tax dollars to operate, so your mail will still be delivered.
  • Your wallet: When the government shut down for 16 days in 2013, it cost taxpayers $2 billion in lost productivity, according to the Office of Management and Budget.
  • Tourism: All national parks, museums, and zoos will be closed. You might also have trouble getting a passport.
  • Transportation: There could be some airline and train delays, as "non-essential" employees will be furloughed.
  • Food stamps: You can still collect these. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is a mandatory entitlement program.
  • Federal courts: The courts won't close their doors immediately, but they could be affected if a shutdown lasts more than 10 days, according to past guidance.
  • Social security: You will still receive payments under the program, as it is deemed mandatory by the government.
  • Loans: Whether you own a small business or are planning to buy a house, you'll have to wait if you need a loan from the government.

One government entity that won't be affected by a partial shutdown? The office of special counsel Robert Mueller, which is "funded from a permanent indefinite appropriation."

Go deeper: Trump's Christmas shutdown spooks GOP

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
20 mins ago - Economy & Business

America on borrowed time

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Economic recovery will not be linear as the world continues to grapple with the uncertainty of the pandemic.

Why it matters: Despite being propped up by an extraordinary amount of fiscal stimulus and support from central banks, the state of the global economy remains fragile.

Scoop: Gina Haspel threatened to resign over plan to install Kash Patel as CIA deputy

CIA Director Gina Haspel. Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

CIA Director Gina Haspel threatened to resign in early December after President Trump cooked up a hasty plan to install loyalist Kash Patel, a former aide to Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), as her deputy, according to three senior administration officials with direct knowledge of the matter.

Why it matters: The revelation stunned national security officials and almost blew up the leadership of the world's most powerful spy agency. Only a series of coincidences — and last minute interventions from Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Pat Cipollone — stopped it.

Updated 13 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Coronavirus deaths reach 4,000 per day as hospitals remain in crisis mode — CDC warns highly transmissible coronavirus variant could become dominant in U.S. in March.
  2. Politics: Biden says, "We will manage the hell out of" vaccine distribution — Biden taps ex-FDA chief to lead Operation Warp Speed amid rollout of COVID plan — Widow of GOP congressman-elect who died of COVID-19 will run to fill his seat.
  3. Vaccine: Battling Black mistrust of the vaccines"Pharmacy deserts" could become vaccine deserts — Instacart to give $25 to shoppers who get vaccine.
  4. Economy: Unemployment filings explode againFed chair: No interest rate hike coming any time soon —  Inflation rose more than expected in December.
  5. World: WHO team arrives in China to investigate pandemic origins.