Photo: Alex Wong / Getty

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court will not review the Trump administration's appeal on an injunction which has stopped Trump from rescinding DACA, the "Dreamers" will be able to continue to renew their visas until a final decision on the case — likely May or June of 2019.

Bottom line: While court actions have bought Dreamers and Congress another year, saving Republicans and President Trump from the months of Dreamer deportation coverage ahead of midterm elections, it isn't a permanent solution.

What this means: Undocumented immigrants who are eligible for DACA's protection but who are not currently enrolled in the program are still not permitted to apply. Only those who are already protected by DACA can apply for a two-year renewal once their visas are 150 or fewer days away from expiring.

Between the lines: Both district courts that have issued injunctions on ending DACA have admitted that it is lawful for Trump to end the program, which started under Barack Obama. It's the administration's reasons for ending the program that haven't held up, meaning the Trump administration could hypothetically try again.

"We look forward to having this case expeditiously heard by the appeals court and, if necessary, the Supreme Court, where we fully expect to prevail."
— White House spokesman Raj Shah in a statement

Fast-forward to next year: If the appeals court decides that the Trump administration's decision to rescind DACA was lawful and Congress fails to find a solution, DACA will be gone and those "Dreamers" will again face losing their jobs and potential deportation once their visas expire.

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Beirut residents are still clearing rubble from streets that appear war-torn, days after a blast that shocked the country and horrified the world.

Why it matters: The explosion is likely to accelerate a painful cycle Lebanon was already living through — discontent, economic distress, and emigration.

Wolf Blitzer marks 15 years in "The Situation Room"

Wolf Blitzer on the White House beat in 1993, along with NBC's Brian Williams, CBS' Rita Braver and ABC's Brit Hume. Photo: Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images H

Aug. 8, 2005 — "The Situation Room's" debut on CNN wherein the host first said: "I'm Wolf Blitzer and you're in The Situation Room, where news and information from around the world arrive in one place simultaneously!"

The state of play: When the pandemic took off in the U.S. in March, Blitzer started working 7 days a week for 60+ days, until he took a Sunday off. Then he continued 7 days a week until he took a few days off.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 4,945,795 — Total deaths: 161,456 — Total recoveries: 1,623,870 — Total tests: 60,415,558Map.
  3. Politics: Trump says he's prepared to sign executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Public health: Fauci says chances are "not great" that COVID-19 vaccine will be 98% effective
  5. Science: Indoor air is the next coronavirus frontline.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.