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Expand chart
Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

In mid-August the yield on WeWork's 2025 junk bond was 6.8%, and this week it hit 16.1%.

The state of play: WeWork's IPO was pulled at the end of September, depriving the company of billions of dollars in IPO proceeds as well as even more liquidity in the form of an attached loan commitment. That news drove the yield on WeWork's bonds up to 11.6%.

  • Since then, WeWork has revealed a stunning $1.25 billion quarterly loss; it is also now embroiled in an SEC investigation, as well as legal fights with disgruntled shareholders.

By the numbers: The bond traded this week at a price of $709, to yield 16.1%. It has 11 coupon payments left of $39.37 each, which means that if you hold it to maturity — and if it doesn't default — then you'll receive a total of $1,433.125 in principal and interest payments by the time the bond matures in May 2025. That's more than double the current price.

The bottom line: Before the IPO was pulled, WeWork had multiple funding sources, both in debt and equity. Now, however, Softbank seems to be the only institution willing to invest. If the Japanese tech giant ever tires of throwing good money after bad, then the chances of the 2025 bonds getting repaid in full look slim indeed.

Go deeper: WeWork to lay off 2,400 employees

Go deeper

Off the Rails

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence

Photo illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios. Photos: Elijah Nouvelage, Alex Wong/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. Axios takes you inside the collapse of a president with a special series.

Episode 7: Trump turns on Pence. Trump believes the vice president can solve all his problems by simply refusing to certify the Electoral College results. It's a simple test of loyalty: Trump or the U.S. Constitution.

"The end is coming, Donald."

The male voice in the TV ad boomed through the White House residence during "Fox & Friends" commercial breaks. Over and over and over. "The end is coming, Donald. ... On Jan. 6, Mike Pence will put the nail in your political coffin."

Big Tech's post-riot reckoning

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

The Capitol insurrection means the anti-tech talk in Washington is more likely to lead to action, since it's ever clearer that the attack was planned, at least in part, on social media.

Why it matters: The big platforms may have hoped they'd move to D.C.'s back burner, with the Hill focused on the Biden agenda and the pandemic out of control. But now, there'll be no escaping harsh scrutiny.

31 mins ago - Technology

Why domestic terrorists are so hard to police online

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Domestic terrorism has proven to be more difficult for Big Tech companies to police online than foreign terrorism.

The big picture: That's largely because the politics are harder. There's more unity around the need to go after foreign extremists than domestic ones — and less danger of overreaching and provoking a backlash.