Mar 7, 2017

We're watching more video, just not on TV

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Data: Consumer Technology Association; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

A new Consumer Technology Association study finds that video viewership has increased more than 30% over the past five years to 16.8 hours per week, but almost half of all video viewing is being done on devices other than television (smartphone, laptop, desktop, tablet, etc.) — the highest rate its ever been. According to the study, that near 50/50 split represents a dramatic change from just four years ago, when consumers viewed TV video 62% of the time. Desktop video viewership has also declined by over 50% since 2012.

Why it matters:

  1. TV is facing sharp advertising and subscription declines in response to diminishing viewership. Experts predict that 2017 will be the first year digital advertising spending eclipses TV. A portion of the CTA report released to Axios earlier this week showed that for first time, more people are using streaming services for content than paid TV.
  2. Around 1/3 of consumers say that even though they are accessing more content on mobile, the video viewing quality isn't great. This is because publishers and advertisers are still creating horizontal video products with desktop and TV viewership in mind, instead of optimizing their content for vertical viewing experiences on smartphones. Nieman Lab argues that the lack of adaptation comes from uncertainty in the publishing world about how to best make vertical video.

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Facebook changing deepfake policies

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Facebook is tightening its policies on "manipulated media," including deepfakes, Monika Bickert, the company's vice president of global policy management, says in a blog post.

Why it matters: Facebook has been criticized for the way it enforces its policies on deepfakes (AI-generated audio and video) and other misleading media. In particular, critics took aim at the tech giant's decision to allow a doctored video of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to remain on its platform last year.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

What's happened so far at CES 2020

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

There will be a ton of tech news coming out of Las Vegas this week, and Axios has you covered with all the big news in one place.

The big picture: The biggest products of the year tend to be announced elsewhere, but in terms of sheer volume of consumer tech news, CES is still unmatched. For more on what to expect, check out this preview story. And check back all week for the latest from the Axios tech team.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Jan 8, 2020

HBO Max will lean into mobile viewing

Photo: Consumer Technology Association

The HBO Max team is looking at ways to make the streaming service more mobile-friendly than some of its subscription video competitors.

Why it matters: If AT&T can build an app that can successfully leans into mobile, it may be able to capture an audience that Netflix and Hulu have intentionally been less focused on, at least to date.

Go deeperArrowJan 14, 2020