Sara Fischer Mar 7, 2017
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We're watching more video, just not on TV

Data: Consumer Technology Association; Chart: Lazaro Gamio / Axios

A new Consumer Technology Association study finds that video viewership has increased more than 30% over the past five years to 16.8 hours per week, but almost half of all video viewing is being done on devices other than television (smartphone, laptop, desktop, tablet, etc.) — the highest rate its ever been. According to the study, that near 50/50 split represents a dramatic change from just four years ago, when consumers viewed TV video 62% of the time. Desktop video viewership has also declined by over 50% since 2012.

Why it matters:

  1. TV is facing sharp advertising and subscription declines in response to diminishing viewership. Experts predict that 2017 will be the first year digital advertising spending eclipses TV. A portion of the CTA report released to Axios earlier this week showed that for first time, more people are using streaming services for content than paid TV.
  2. Around 1/3 of consumers say that even though they are accessing more content on mobile, the video viewing quality isn't great. This is because publishers and advertisers are still creating horizontal video products with desktop and TV viewership in mind, instead of optimizing their content for vertical viewing experiences on smartphones. Nieman Lab argues that the lack of adaptation comes from uncertainty in the publishing world about how to best make vertical video.
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Where Trump's steel and aluminum trade war will hit first

Note: Includes only products under the "Iron & Steel & Ferroalloy" and "Alumina & Aluminum & Processing" NAICS commodity classifications. Data: Census Bureau; Chart: Chris Canipe and Lazaro Gamio / Axios

The Trump administration has begun imposing tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum, but several countries are exempted temporarily until May 1, as shown in the chart above. The administration may still apply quotas on exempted countries to prevent a flood of foreign steel and aluminum in the U.S. market, per the White House.

Why it matters: After railroading past a number of his advisors, Trump announced the tariffs on imports of steel (at 25%) and aluminum (at 10%) earlier this month, citing national security concerns. But with the exemption noted above, the tariffs won't carry major bite, at least to start.

Haley Britzky 10 mins ago
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Both Bush and Obama also requested line item veto power

Donald Trump.
Photo: Mark Wilson / Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Friday evening that to avoid having "this omnibus situation from ever happening again," he wants Congress to re-instate "a line-item veto."

Why it matters: This would allow him to veto specific parts of a bill without getting rid of the entire thing. Trump was deeply unhappy with the $1.3 trillion spending bill approved by Congress early Friday morning, but signed it anyway on Friday afternoon.