Photo: Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The national dialogue about racism has renewed calls for the Washington Redskins to change their name — and now protesters are targeting their sponsors, something a former high-ranking team official called "different."

Driving the news: Nike, FedEx and PepsiCo each received letters signed by 87 investors and shareholders worth a combined $620 billion asking the brands to cut ties with the Redskins unless they change their name, AdWeek reports.

The backdrop: When a 2016 Washington Post poll found nine in 10 Native Americans weren't offended by the name, Redskins owner Daniel Snyder said the team, fans and community believe it "represents honor, respect and pride."

Meanwhile, in D.C., officials made it clear Wednesday that Snyder will not be able to build a new stadium on the 190-acre, federally-owned RFK Stadium site unless he changes the team's name, per WashPost.

  • "There is no viable path, locally or federally, for the Washington football team to return to Washington, D.C., without first changing the team name," said D.C. Deputy Mayor John Falcicchio. (They currently play in Landover, Md.)
  • "The time [for the name] has ended. There is no way to justify it. You either step into this century or you don't," said U.S. Rep. Raúl M. Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

Go deeper: The 72 hours that changed the NFL

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Gulf Coast braces for Zeta after storm strengthens into hurricane

Hurricane Zeta's forecast path. Photo: National Hurricane Center

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) declared a state of emergency Monday as Zeta strengthened into a hurricane and threatened Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula as it moved towards the U.S. Gulf Coast.

The state of play: Zeta was expected to make landfall on the northern part of the Yucatan Peninsula Monday night, bringing with it a "dangerous storm surge" and "heavy rainfall" as it moved into the Gulf of Mexico, the National Hurricane Service said.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: The swing states where the pandemic is raging — Pence no longer expected to attend Barrett confirmation vote after COVID exposure.
  2. Health: 13 states set single-day case records last week
  3. Business: Where stimulus is needed most.
  4. Education: The dangerous instability of school re-openings.
  5. World: Restrictions grow across Europe.
  6. Media: Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine.

Supreme Court rejects request to extend Wisconsin absentee ballot deadline

Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Supreme Court in a 5-3 decision Monday rejected an effort by Wisconsin Democrats and civil rights groups to extend the state's deadline for counting absentee ballots to six days after Election Day, as long as they were postmarked by Nov. 3.

Why it matters: All ballots must now be received by 8 p.m. on Election Day in Wisconsin, a critical swing state in the presidential election.