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Walmart in April. Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images

Walmart is resuming its monitoring and counting of customers who enter their stores in an effort to promote social distancing, while major grocers including Publix, Wegmans, Giant and Kroger are reinstating purchase limits on some essential items, CNBC reports.

Why it matters: The moves come as new infections continue to surge across the U.S., with several states reimposing or tightening their coronavirus restrictions.

Details... Walmart since April had imposed a capacity limit of about 20% occupancy in its stores, but had stopped metering its shopper counts in recent months. According to CNBC, major grocery chains had largely eased shopping restrictions, but in recent weeks:

  • Publix, Giant and Kroger have started to reinstate some purchase limits on toilet paper and paper towels.
  • Wegmans is beginning to limit some purchases of paper towels, cleaning supplies and disinfecting wipes.
  • Grocers have noted that they are not experiencing shortages at this time, but are taking precautionary measures.

Go deeper

Updated 21 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release."
  2. Politics: Supreme Court backs religious groups on New York COVID restrictions.
  3. World: Thailand, Philippines sign deal with AstraZeneca for vaccine.
  4. Economy: Safety nets to disappear in December Black Friday shopping across the U.S., in photosAmazon hires 1,400 workers a day throughout pandemic.
  5. Education: National standardized tests delayed until 2022.
Updated 21 hours ago - Sports

NFL reschedules Thanksgiving matchup for second time due to COVID outbreak

Photo: Rob Carr/Getty Images

The NFL has once again postponed a Baltimore Ravens-Pittsburgh Steelers matchup originally scheduled for primetime on Thanksgiving day due to a COVID-19 outbreak.

Why it matters: It's the first time the league has had to scrap a game since October, as the U.S. copes with another surge in coronavirus infections heading into the holidays.

22 hours ago - Health

WHO: AstraZeneca vaccine must be evaluated on "more than a press release"

A medical syringe and vial with fake coronavirus vaccine in front of the World Health Organization (WHO) logo. Photo Illustration: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Top scientists at the World Health Organization on Friday called for more detailed information on a coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford.

Why it matters: Oxford and AstraZeneca have said the vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses. AstraZeneca has since acknowledged that the smaller dose received by some participants was the result of an error by a contractor, per the New York Times.