Photo: Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Walgreens announced yesterday that it won't sell tobacco products to anyone younger than 21, beginning in September — a response to the FDA's crackdown on its sales to young people, Forbes reports.

Why it matters: The rise in teen vaping has alarmed public health officials, prompting strong regulatory action and, increasingly, support of a higher smoking age in response.

  • Earlier this month, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he'll be introducing a bill raising the federal smoking age to 21 — a huge boost for the effort.

The big picture: The FDA said in February that Walgreens was the top violator among pharmacies that sell tobacco products, in terms of selling illegally to minors. In contrast, CVS Health stopped selling all tobacco products in 2014.

Go deeper: The growing push to raise the smoking age to 21

Go deeper

Dion Rabouin, author of Markets
49 mins ago - Economy & Business

Coronavirus surge is sinking consumer confidence

Data: Hamilton Place Strategies, CivicScience; Chart: Axios Visuals

The rise in coronavirus cases in certain parts of the U.S. is stunting confidence across the country, a crop of new reports show.

Driving the news: After stalling during the previous two-week period, overall economic sentiment declined for the first time in two months, according to the Economic Sentiment Index, a biweekly survey from data firm CivicScience and Hamilton Place Strategies (HPS).

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Politics: Obama: Trump is "jealous of COVID's media coverage."
  2. Health: Mask mandates help control the rise in coronavirus hospitalizations. Hospitals face a crush.
  3. Business: Coronavirus testing is a windfall. Winter threat spurs new surge of startup activity.
  4. Media: Pandemic causes TV providers to lose the most subscribers ever.
  5. World: Putin mandates face masks.

The GOP's monstrous math problem

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Republicans, win or lose next week, face a big — and growing — math problem.

The state of play: They're relying almost exclusively on a shrinking demographic (white men), living in shrinking areas (small, rural towns), creating a reliance on people with shrinking incomes (white workers without college degrees) to survive.