Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Stay on top of the latest market trends

Subscribe to Axios Markets for the latest market trends and economic insights. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sports news worthy of your time

Binge on the stats and stories that drive the sports world with Axios Sports. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tech news worthy of your time

Get our smart take on technology from the Valley and D.C. with Axios Login. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Get the inside stories

Get an insider's guide to the new White House with Axios Sneak Peek. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Denver news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Des Moines news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Twin Cities news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Tampa Bay news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Want a daily digest of the top Charlotte news?

Get a daily digest of the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

Since President Trump took office, attacks on the media have been his go-to strategy at rallies, on Twitter and elsewhere.

Driving the news: A BBC cameraman was shoved on the media platform by a Trump supporter who then hurled explicit insults at the press during Trump's rally in El Paso, Texas, on Monday. The BBC's Washington correspondent called the incident "an incredibly violent attack," highlighting the fact that Trump's anti-media rhetoric is "a constant feature of these rallies."

The big picture: Past presidents have argued it’s their job to tone down the heat in moments of high tension and unease, especially following deadly acts of domestic terrorism. But Trump told "Axios on HBO" last year that his divisive rhetoric is his "only form of fighting back," and that his supporters crave it. Meanwhile, the past two years have seen a shift in the political landscape between the media and the public, something several press freedom organizations describe as being of "grave concern."

Violence against the media since Trump's rise to presidency:

  • Conservative essayist Bethany Mandel purchased a handgun, The Daily Beast reported in 2016, after receiving anti-Semitic and threatening messages from apparent Trump supporters after she denounced then-candidate Trump.
  • Guardian reporter Ben Jacobs was body-slammed in 2017 by Republican Congressional candidate Greg Gianforte. President Trump, at a rally for Gianforte last year, said that "[a]ny guy that can do a body slam, he is my type!"
  • A T-shirt advocating for hanging journalists, which reads "Rope. Tree. Journalist. Some assembly required," was sold on Walmart's website in 2017. A Walmart spokesperson said the shirt was sold by a third-party seller and removed from their site "as soon as it was brought to our attention."
  • Five journalists were killed and two were injured in a shooting at the Capital Gazette newsroom in Annapolis, Maryland, last summer — the deadliest attack on journalists in the U.S. since 9/11.
  • Pipe bombs were mailed to prominent media organizations and Democratic figures last year — and the suspect appeared to be a Trump supporter.
  • A man was arrested after threatening to shoot Boston Globe employees, saying in a threatening phone call: "You're the enemy of the people and we're going to kill every ... one of you."
  • CNN's Brian Stelter aired a call from a C-SPAN viewer and Trump supporter who said he wants to shoot Stelter and fellow CNN anchor Don Lemon if he sees them.
  • A man was arrested after allegedly making 40 threatening calls to CNN, which included death threats to a reporter USA Today identified as Don Lemon.
  • Trump rally attendees consistently level insults at media covering the event.
A tweet previously embedded here has been deleted or was tweeted from an account that has been suspended or deleted.

The other side: Protestors surrounded the home of Fox News host Tucker Carlson last November, chanting “We know where you sleep at night.” His wife was at home; no one was injured but one person cracked the front door after throwing themselves against it, per the Washington Post.

Go deeper: Trump says supporters demand his red-hot rhetoric

Go deeper

Senate retirements could attract GOP troublemakers

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.). Photo: Jim Lo Scalzo/EPA/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sen. Roy Blunt's retirement highlights the twin challenge facing Senate Republicans: finding good replacement candidates and avoiding a pathway for potential troublemakers to join their ranks.

Why it matters: While the midterm elections are supposed to be a boon to the party out of power, the recent run of retirements — which may not be over — is upending that assumption for the GOP in 2022.

Congressional diversity growing - slowly

Data: Brookings Institution and Pew Research Center; Note: No data on Native Americans in Congress before the 107th Congress; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

The number of non-white senators and House members in the 535-seat Congress has been growing steadily in the past several decades — but representation largely lags behind the overall U.S. population.

Why it matters: Non-whites find it harder to break into the power system because of structural barriers such as the need to quit a job to campaign full time for office, as Axios reported in its latest Hard Truths Deep Dive.

Staff for retiring Senate Republicans a K Street prize

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The retirements of high-profile Senate Republicans mean a lot of experienced staffers will soon be seeking new jobs, and Washington lobbying and public affairs firms are eyeing a potential glut of top-notch talent.

Why it matters: Roy Blunt is the fifth Republican dealmaker in the Senate to announce his retirement next year. Staffers left behind who can navigate the upper chamber of Congress will be gold for the city’s influence industry.