Alayna Treene Feb 21, 2017
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Verizon revises its deal with Yahoo (again)

The WSJ reports that Verizon will cut its $4.83 billion deal to buy Yahoo by as much as $350 million, and will evenly split the costs from Yahoo's two major data breaches. Verizon has also agreed to give up its right to sue over the idea that Yahoo covered up its hacks.

Note: Last week, Bloomberg reported that Verizon cut the deal price by $250 million, a great compromise for Yahoo after its messy data breaches. Even with the news that Verizon wants to lower the price by another $100 million, Yahoo is surely still breathing a sigh of relief that Verizon hasn't killed the deal entirely.

Amy Harder 1 hour ago
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Column / Harder Line

The swamp’s tug-o-war over America’s ethanol mandate

American eagle with corn in its claws
Illustration: Rebecca Zisser / Axios

A biofuels standard Congress passed more than a decade ago in the name of rural development, energy security and climate change has devolved into an arcane fight over market share that has nothing to do with those initial three goals.

Why it matters: The law — called the renewable fuel standard that requires refineries to blend biofuels into gasoline — is a textbook example of how regulations create winners, losers and unintended consequences.

Caitlin Owens 1 hour ago
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GOP: Fixing the tax law is nothing like fixing the ACA

Sens. John Thune, Roy Blunt and Mitch McConnell
Sens. John Thune, Roy Blunt and Mitch McConnell (Photo: Al Drago / Getty Images)

Republicans have discovered their tax law contains a mistake and are hoping Democrats will help them fix it. But if the narrative of "one party passed a giant law and now wants to change it" sounds familiar, Republicans are insisting this is different from when they wouldn't help fix the Democrats' Affordable Care Act.

Between the lines: This is a great indicator of why Congress struggles to get anything done — because now the precedent has been set for one party to refuse to fix problems with the other party's laws. And for what it's worth, some Democrats are also denying the parallel — because, of course, they say their ACA process was much more inclusive than the GOP's tax one.