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After a two-year hiatus, HBO's "Veep" is returning on Sunday, March 31, for its seventh and final run that’s said to be more uncomfortable, biting, absurdist and uncanny than ever, Flipboard's Mia Quagliarello writes for Axios.

The scene: Season 7 sees Selina Mayer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) on the campaign trail, running for president again. This time her challengers include her on-and-off-again flame Tom James (Hugh Laurie), staffer Amy Brookheimer (Anna Chlumsky)'s ex-boyfriend Buddy Calhoun (Matt Oberg), and the smarmy Jonah Ryan (Timothy Simons).

  • From there, the satire goes for the jugular—like when Selina tries to capitalize on a mass shooting to advance her campaign, or when Jonah becomes the face of the #NotMe movement, featuring women coming forward to say they didn't sleep with him.

Between the lines: When "Veep" launched in 2012, the political landscape was pretty different from what it is today. Even season 6 was in the can in 2016 before it could be too influenced by the current climate.

  • But the need to pause production so that Louis-Dreyfus could go through cancer treatment let showrunner-director David Mandel re-examine shifting norms and mine real-life situations for the show.
  • "If you look back at the previous six seasons, so much of the show was, ‘Oh my God, this is what a politician is like behind closed doors’ — but those closed doors are gone,” Mandel told Variety.

The bottom line: Louis-Dreyfus and Mandel took their cues from "Seinfeld" (where she played Elaine Benes and he was a writer) and sought to end the series on a creative high. "The storytelling dictated the end of the show," Louis-Dreyfus told Entertainment Weekly. “It felt right.”

The goodbye tour:

Earlier this week, Louis-Dreyfus went on "Jimmy Fallon" to unveil what she said was the first and only "Veep" blooper to become public.

If you're feeling sentimental about this end, watch this video in which the actors say a few final words to their characters.

This new weekly report about a notable pop culture phenomenon is brought to you in collaboration with Flipboard, a content discovery platform where you can also find Axios. You can get more entertainment news in Flipboard's pop culture destination, The Culturist.

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The big picture: Rescuing the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) is near the top of Biden's foreign policy priority list. He says he'd re-enter the deal once Iran returns to compliance, and use it as the basis on which to negotiate a broader and longer-lasting deal with Iran.

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Progressive leaders see Sen. Kamala Harris, if she's elected vice president, as their conduit to a post-Biden Democratic Party where the power will be in younger, more diverse and more liberal hands.

  • Why it matters: The party's rising left sees Harris as the best hope for penetrating Joe Biden's older, largely white inner circle.

If Biden wins, Harris will become the first woman, first Black American and first Indian American to serve as a U.S. vice president — and would instantly be seen as the first in line for the presidency should Biden decide against seeking a second term.