Protesters attend a rally against a controversial extradition law proposal in Hong Kong. Photo: Dale De La Rey/AFP/Getty Images

The State Department said Monday that Hong Kong's special status with the U.S. is at risk over proposed changes to a law that would allow the extradition of individuals facing charges to mainland China.

Details: A State Department spokesperson told a news briefing that the U.S. "expresses its grave concern" at the changes, backed by Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam and due to go to the full legislature on Wednesday despite mass protests. "The continued erosion of the ‘one country, two systems’ framework puts at risk Hong Kong’s long-established special status in international affairs," she said, referring to the 1992 U.S.-Hong Kong Policy Act.

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