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Expand chart
COVID Tracking Project

The U.S. confirmed at least 83,010 coronavirus cases on Friday, the country's highest daily total since the pandemic started, according to data from the COVID Tracking Project.

By the numbers: Friday's total surpassed the U.S.'s previous record set on July 17 when 76,842 cases were recorded. 

  • The current surge is more widespread than the uptick seen on July 17, when just four states accounted for more than 40,000 cases recorded, according to the Washington Post.

Why it matters: Experts are warning that the U.S. is "facing a whole lot of trouble” as the country heads into the winter months.

  • NIAID director Anthony Fauci told MSNBC last week that an uptick in hospitalizations in several states nationwide "is a bad place to be when you’re going into the cooler weather of the fall and the colder weather of the winter."
  • Earlier Friday, Fauci warned such upticks are "will ultimately lead to an increase in deaths."

Worth noting: President Trump, without evidence, said during Thursday’s debate that the U.S. is “rounding the turn” in the pandemic and won’t “have a dark winter at all.”

  • Joe Biden responded that “anyone responsible for that many deaths should not remain as president of the United States of America."

The big picture: Nearly 130,000 fewer people will die of COVID-19 this winter if 95% of Americans wear face masks in public, according to research published Friday.

Go deeper: The pandemic is getting worse again

Editor's note: This story has been updated throughout.

Go deeper

Updated Dec 4, 2020 - Health

Fauci apologizes for criticizing U.K. regulators over Pfizer vaccine approval

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Anthony Fauci, the U.S. government's top infectious-disease expert, on Thursday walked back his earlier comments criticizing British regulators over their recent approval the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine.

What he's saying: "I have a great deal of confidence in what the U.K. does both scientifically and from a regulator standpoint," Dr Fauci told the BBC on Thursday after saying earlier in the day that U.K. regulators "rushed" their approval of the vaccine.

Updated 22 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Highlights from Biden and Harris' first joint interview since the election

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris sat down with CNN on Thursday for their first joint interview since the election.

The big picture: In the hour-long segment, the twosome laid out plans for responding to the pandemic, jump-starting the economy and managing the transition of power, among other priorities.

Romney: Trump's lack of leadership on COVID-19 is "a great human tragedy"

Sen. Mitt Romney and President Trump. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

GOP Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah) told CNN Thursday that President Trump's lack of leadership during the coronavirus pandemic is "a great human tragedy."

Driving the news: Trump has largely stayed silent on the country's worsening pandemic in recent weeks, even as the U.S. experienced a record daily death toll and hospitalizations surpassed 100,000 for the first time. Instead, the president has focused much of his public commentary on pushing baseless claims of widespread election fraud.