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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Bullish stock traders have taken just about every opportunity to buy U.S. equities after positive news about developments in the U.S.-China trade war this year, but both the S&P 500 and Nasdaq had their worst day in a month on Tuesday as obstacles to that deal mounted.

What's happening: Stocks reversed earlier gains after President Trump addressed the UN and accused China of failing to keep its promises and engaging in predatory practices that had cost millions of jobs in the U.S. and other countries.

  • "Trump's comments to the U.N. were very antagonistic toward China. In the last couple of weeks there's been optimism trade would go in a positive direction," Chris Zaccarelli, chief investment officer at Independent Advisor Alliance, told Reuters.
  • "It was the tone and the fact he listed out in great detail all the gripes the U.S. has with China."
  • "All that trade optimism that's been building has been sucked out of the air and replaced with pessimism."

U.S. stocks fell further after Congressman John Lewis committed his support for impeachment proceedings based on reports Trump pressured Ukraine's president to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son by withholding U.S. aid.

  • “This is going to be news that spills out over time, but I can’t imagine the start of this process improves the tone of the U.S.-China trade talks … if I’m China I feel empowered," Art Hogan, chief market strategist at National Securities, told CNBC.
  • "This is a market that’s been hanging on that tone getting better and I think it just got worse on the president’s hawkish tone at the UN and this process."

Where it stands: The impeachment inquiry House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced Tuesday doesn't realistically portend a Trump exit from the White House, but it does further cloud what the market can expect from government policy, said Marc Chandler, global market strategist at Bannockburn Global Forex.

  • “My sense is the impeachment is well ahead of the country. I don’t think it’s going to be successful, and ... I don’t think the country is behind it. It just adds to uncertainty,” Chandler wrote in a note.

Go deeper: China cancels U.S. farm visits while Trump holds out for a "big deal"

Go deeper

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Doug Emhoff, Vice President-elect Kamala Harris, Jill Biden and President-elect Joe Biden arrive at the U.S. Capitol for the inauguration on Jan. 20. Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are being inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power at the Capitol only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters. Trump did not attend the ceremony.

Updated 33 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris have arrived at the Capitol. Members of congressional leadership and VIPs will soon be introduced. Watch a livestream here.

What's next: Biden and Harris will take their oaths of office. Shortly after, President Biden will deliver his inaugural address. What to expect.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
1 hour ago - Economy & Business

Momentum builds for major antitrust reform

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump's outgoing antitrust chief Makan Delrahim on Tuesday endorsed a proposal from House Democrats that would put new limits on acquisitions by large companies, during comments made at a Duke University event.

Why it matters: Momentum is building for major antitrust reform, updating rules that were written for railroads instead of routers.

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