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U.S. Department of Defense / AP

President Trump's airstrikes in Syria in response to Tuesday's chemical weapons attack will continue to have political repercussions. Here's the latest on that situation:

  • New airstrikes on Saturday hit the same Syrian town that was targeted in the chemical weapons attack earlier in the week.
  • President Trump sent a letter to Congress, which was delivered Saturday, justifying the strikes.
"I acted in the vital national security and foreign policy interests of the United States, pursuant to my constitutional authority to conduct foreign relations and as Commander in Chief and Chief Executive. The United States will take additional action, as necessary and appropriate, to further its important national interests."
  • North Korea called the airstrikes an "unforgivable act of aggression," per Reuters.
  • Boris Johnston, the UK's foreign secretary, canceled his Saturday trip to Moscow just hours before he was supposed to fly there. "Developments in Syria have changed the situation fundamentally...We deplore Russia's continued defence of the Assad regime," Johnson said in a statement.
  • The Pentagon released satellite images of the damage from the airstrikes at the Shayrat base, including destroyed and damaged aircraft shelters.
  • Ivanka tweeted in support of the decision: "The times we are living in call for difficult decisions - Proud of my father for refusing to accept these horrendous crimes against humanity"
  • Tillerson was already scheduled to travel to Moscow next week before the strikes happened, and a senior aide confirmed to ABC News that he will still make the trip and he will discuss Assad while there.
  • The Global Coalition to Counter ISIS carried out 14 missile strikes against the Islamic State near Raqqa in Syria just 14 hours after Trump's airstrikes on Thursday night. That strike reportedly killed 15 civilians, including four children.

Go deeper

Updated 1 min ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden, Harris and nearly all the living former presidents and their spouses lay a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.