Mar 7, 2020 - Health

More universities cancel on-campus classes as threat of coronavirus looms

Photo: Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Stanford University and the University of Washington are among the first colleges in the U.S. to suspend in-person classes as the novel coronavirus spreads in California, Washington state and beyond.

The big picture: Universities are mobilizing emergency planning teams to determine what shutdowns could look like, as more Americans test positive for the coronavirus, The New York Times reports. Some schools have told students to prepare for a shutdown if a faculty member or student becomes infected.

The state of play: Many college students are traveling across the country and the world for spring break vacations, increasing their chances of contracting the virus and drawing concern that they will bring COVID-19 back to campus.

Go deeper... Coronavirus updates: Global infections top 100,000

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Some Ivy League schools increase rate of admissions

Harvard University campus. Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Some Ivy League schools saw freshman admission rates slightly tick up this year, reversing a multi-year trend of frantic competition and scrutiny over the selective spots, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Why now: The novel coronavirus has presented colleges with a variety of challenges, with the pandemic confusing enrollment projections for the coming academic year. Some schools took students off waitlists or changed their denials and admitted them to ensure they enroll full classes, per the WSJ.

Inside the world of college sports financing

Adapted from NCAA Research; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

At the more than 1,100 schools across all three NCAA divisions, roughly $18.1 billion was spent on athletics in 2018.

Why it matters: The total revenue generated was $10.3 billion, leaving nearly $8 billion that had to be subsidized by other sources — $6.5 billion from institutional and government support and $1.5 billion from student fees.

Go deeperArrowMar 11, 2020 - Sports

U.S. coronavirus deaths top 2,000

Nurses at Penn State Health St. Joseph conduct drive-thru coronavirus testing on March 27. Photo: Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

More than 2,000 people have died from the novel coronavirus in the U.S. as of Saturday, per data from the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University.

Why it matters: Recorded deaths in the U.S. surpassed 1,000 two days ago. The U.S. has the most COVID-19 cases in the world, exceeding China and Italy.

Go deeper: Trump weighs quarantine of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut