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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Americans can now expect to live 78.6 years, according to new data released by the Centers of Disease Control, a slight drop from 78.7 years in 2016.

Why it matters: Globally, humans are increasingly expected to live longer and healthier. But with a growing number of opioid overdose deaths and climbing suicide rates in the United States, that trend has reversed over the past three years — against the norm for most developed nations.

Older millennials between 25 and 34 years old saw the highest increase in death rates. The only age group to see a significant decrease in its death rate was 45- to 54-year-olds.

  • CDC Director Robert R. Redfield, M.D. said in a statement, "Life expectancy gives us a snapshot of the Nation’s overall health and these sobering statistics are a wakeup call that we are losing too many Americans, too early and too often, to conditions that are preventable."

The gender gap: Women's life expectancy in the U.S. has remained unchanged at 81.1 years since 2015. Men, who have had higher numbers of opioid overdose deaths and higher rates of suicide over the past few years, saw their life expectancies drop from 76.5 in 2014 to 76.1 in 2017.

  • Heart disease and cancer remain the leading causes of death in the U.S.
  • Suicide rates have continued to climb, increasing 33% from 1999 to 2017, according to the CDC.
  • Drug overdose deaths also increased over the past year from 63,632 to 70,237

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Journalism enters dangerous new era

Illustration: Brendan Lynch/Axios

The Capitol attack on Jan. 6 resulted in at least nine physical assaults against journalists and at least five arrests, per the U.S. Press Freedom Tracker's top editor.

Why it matters: President Trump's harsh rhetoric towards the press has empowered leaders abroad and locally in the U.S. to continue to attack press that they don't like.

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The beginning of the beginning for Biden's climate push

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

Joe Biden's inauguration and the days right after will bring a rat-tat-tat burst of climate policy moves, but keep this in mind amid the splashy pledges: pushing through most of his agenda will be a long, uncertain slog.

Why it matters: Biden's climate plan is far more expansive than anything contemplated under President Obama. But for all the immediate pledges, it will take years to see how far Biden gets.

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Biden's inflation danger

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President-elect Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion stimulus proposal has economists and bullish market analysts revising their U.S. growth expectations higher, predicting a reflation of the economy in 2021 and possibly more booming returns for risk assets.

Yes, but: Others are warning that what's expected to be reflation could actually show up as inflation, a much less welcome phenomenon.