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British Prime Minister Boris Johnson leaves Downing Street in London. Photo: Leon Neal/Getty Images

The U.K.'s hospitality industry has begun a legal challenge to prevent new local coronavirus lockdown rules for England being announced Monday from taking effect, per Reuters.

Driving the news: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson chaired a meeting Oct. 7 "to determine the final interventions." He is expected to announce a three-tier alert system to tackle areas where COVID-19 is surging, the BBC notes.

  • Liverpool City Region is expected to be placed under level 3 restrictions that would likely see bars and other venues closed. Steve Rotheram, mayor of the northwest English region, tweeted, "no agreement has yet been reached with Government."
  • U.K. trade body the Night Time Industries Association told Reuters its legal action seeks to stop the most severe measures.
  • "A judicial review would argue that no evidence supports hospitality venues having contributed to the spread" of COVID-19, the Financial Times reports.

The big picture: Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam said in a statement Sunday, "We are at a tipping point similar to where we were in March."

  • Van-Tam noted that "an estimated 224,000 people have the virus — up from 116,000 last week" and that hospital admissions for COVID-19 are rising again, "as are intensive care admissions."
  • "Although the epidemic re-started in younger adult age groups in the last few weeks, there is clear evidence of gradual spread into older age groups in the worst affected areas. Sadly, just as night follows day, increases in deaths will now follow on in the next few weeks," Van-Tam said.

Go deeper

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.

Biden will reverse Trump's attempt to lift COVID related travel restrictions

Photo: Tasos Katopodis via Getty

The incoming Biden administration will reverse President Trump's last-minute order to lift COVID-19 related travel restrictions, Jen Psaki, the incoming White House press secretary, tweeted.

Why it matters: President Trump ordered entry bans lifted for travelers from the U.K., Ireland, Brazil and much of Europe to go into effect Jan. 26, but the Biden administration will "strengthen public health measures around international travel in order to further mitigate the spread of COVID-19," Jen Psaki said. Biden will be inaugurated on Wednesday, Jan. 20 and Trump will no longer be president by the time the order is set to go into effect.

Dominion sends cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell

Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Dominion Voting Systems on Monday sent a cease and desist letter to My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell over his spread of misinformation related to the 2020 election.

Why it matters: Trump and several of his allies have pushed false conspiracy theories about the company, leading Dominion to take legal action. It's suing pro-Trump lawyer Sidney Powell for defamation and $1.3 billion in damages, and a Dominion employee has sued Trump himself, OANN and Newsmax.

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