Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

As people continue to stay home amid the coronavirus pandemic, leadership at Uber is discussing potentially laying off as much as 20% of the company's workforce, according to The Information. The company's chief technology officer, Thuan Pham, has also recently resigned, Uber confirms.

The big picture: Though Uber's food delivery business is experiencing a boom as restaurants seek to remain afloat, much of its ride-hailing business has dissipated — dipping 60–70% in Seattle during the height of the city's outbreak, for example.

  • The company also recently withdrew its financial forecast for the rest of the year, signaling it anticipates its business to be affected for months to come.

Per a spokesperson: "As you would expect, the company is looking at every possible scenario to ensure we get to the other side of this crisis in a stronger position than ever."

Go deeper: The gig economy's coronavirus test

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California labor commissioner sues Uber and Lyft

Photo: Lane Turner/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

California's Labor Commission has filed lawsuits against Uber and Lyft, accusing them of "committing wage theft by misclassifying employees as independent contractors." The suit will replace individual claims that drivers have filed.

Why it matters: This is the latest move by California officials seeking to force the companies to reclassify their drivers from independent contractors to employees following a new law that went into effect in January.

Deadly Hurricane Zeta churns inland after lashing Louisiana

A satellite image of Hurricane Zeta. Photo: National Hurricane Center/NOAA

Hurricane Zeta has killed at least one person after a downed power line electrocuted a 55-year-old in Louisiana as the storm moved into Alabama overnight.

What's happening: After "battering southeastern Louisiana and southern Mississippi," it began lashing Alabama late Wednesday, per the National Hurricane Center.

49 mins ago - World

Taiwan reaches a record 200 days with no local coronavirus cases

Catholics go through containment protocols including body-temperature measurement and hands-sanitisation before entering the Saint Christopher Parish Church, Taipei City, Taiwan, in July. Photo: Ceng Shou Yi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Taiwan on Thursday marked no locally transmitted coronavirus cases for 200 days, as the island of 23 million people's total number of infections reported stands at 550 and the COVID-19 death toll at seven.

Why it matters: Nowhere else in the world has reached such a milestone. While COVID-19 cases surge across the U.S. and Europe, Taiwan's last locally transmitted case was on April 12. Experts credit tightly regulated travel, early border closure, "rigorous contact tracing, technology-enforced quarantine and universal mask wearing," along with the island state's previous experience with the SARS virus, per Bloomberg.

Go deeper: As Taiwan's profile rises, so does risk of conflict with China