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U.S. President Donald Trump (2nd R), Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (2nd L), UAE Foreign Minister Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan (R) and Bahrain Foreign Minister Abdullatif bin Rashid Al Zayani (L) attend a signing ceremony for the agreements on "normalization of relations" reached between Israel, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Bahrain at the White House in Washington, United States on September 15, 2020. Photo:
Anadolu Agency / Getty Images

The peace treaty between Israel and the United Arab Emirates states that both countries are committed to "working together for a negotiated solution for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that will meet the aspirations and needs of both parties."

Why it matters: The Emiratis face criticism from the Palestinians over their peace treaty with Israel. Officials involved in the negotiations on the text of the treaty told me the Emiratis wanted to include language on Palestinians in the document. The Emiratis wanted stronger language, but Israel did not agree.

The big picture: The Israel-UAE treaty references the peace agreements Israel has with Egypt and Jordan and President Trump's "vision of peace," presented in January. The text also says that Israel and the UAE commit to make effort to achieve a "just, comprehensive, realistic and long lasting" solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Details:

  • The nine-page-long treaty states that Israel and the UAE establish full diplomatic relations and normalization.
  • It says both countries will respect each other's sovereignty and solve disputes only through peaceful means.
  • Both countries will open embassies and exchange ambassadors as soon as possible.
  • Israel and the UAE will work in cooperation and mutual understanding to promote peace and stability in the region.
  • Neither country will allow any hostilities against the other from its territory and will not support any such hostilities by a third party.
  • Both countries will form a joint forum for promoting a culture of peace and coexistence and fighting extremism.
  • The nations will form a trilateral dialogue with the U.S. on a strategic agenda for the Middle East.

What's next: Israel and the UAE are, as soon as possible, going to sign agreements in the fields of: finance and investment, civil aviation, visas, trade and innovation, health, science and technology, tourism, energy and the environment, education, telecommunication, agriculture, food security, water and legal cooperation.

Go deeper

The only Trump foreign policy Biden wants to keep

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Joe Biden disagrees with most of President Trump's foreign policy initiatives, but several of his advisers tell Axios that there is one he plans to keep: the Abraham Accords.

Why it matters: Continuing to push the Abraham Accords — the biblical branding the administration has given to the individual normalization agreements between Israel and Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates — could help Biden build positive relationships with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and other leaders in the Persian Gulf.

Aug 13, 2020 - World

Behind the scenes: How the Israel-UAE deal came together

Trump, Kushner and Netanyahu (L-R). Photo: Kobi Gideon/GPO via Getty

The breakthrough in talks between the U.S., Israel and UAE on a normalization deal came two months ago, White House officials tell me.

Behind the scenes: Talks had been ongoing for more than a year, but they gained new urgency ahead of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's July 1 deadline to move ahead on West Bank annexations.

Nov 3, 2019 - World

Report finds uptick in "anti-Israel" activity on college campuses

Students protest the visit of Danny Danon, Israel's ambassador to the United Nations who was invited to give a lecture at Columbia University, New York City, Feb. 13, 2017. Photo: Mohammed Elshamy/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

American students ran at least 28 campaigns during the 2018–19 academic year to protest the Israeli government and encourage boycotts of Israeli companies and institutions, according to a group that has been monitoring such activity on U.S. campuses since 2011.

The big picture: That's an uptick in "anti-Israel" activity on American college campuses from the levels recorded over the past two years. But it's down from a peak of 44 campaigns in the 2014–15 academic year, per the 2019 Campus Trends Report published by the Israel on Campus Coalition, a group that supports Israel.